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7 Protein-Packed Tofu Scramble Recipes


Tofu scramble is the ultimate high-protein vegan breakfast! It's a quick and adaptable meal that can be modified in countless ways. Here are seven of my go-to, protein-packed tofu scramble recipes.

A plate covered in baby spinach has been piled with a vegan tofu tahini scramble. A fork rests nearby.

I'm all about breakfast this month, as back-to-school season kicks off.

For me, September isn't just about the literal return to school—though I do get excited to watch my friends' kids enter new grades. Early fall is all about getting back to business. It's a time to refocus. I'm hoping that the crisp weather and change of seasons will give me fresh energy to create.

School, work, and all of our other commitments demand good fuel. September and October always encourage me to look after my nutrition. They remind me to plan, prep, and keep a fridge stocked with wholesome staples, like dressings, whole grains, and beans.

The fall season also inspires me to try new recipes. I'm really hoping that's the case this year, given how tough cooking was for me this summer. No matter what, I can count on cooler weather to inspire new baking projects.

None of the creative energy or industriousness that I'm hoping for will be possible with a steady rotation of nutrient-dense vegan breakfasts. Breakfast is a cornerstone of my routine, the food that powers my day. I love my morning meals—and there's no breakfast I love more than tofu scramble.

Why tofu scramble is my number one breakfast

If I had to pick a favorite breakfast, tofu scramble would be it. Yes, I love many other breakfast foods. But tofu scramble wins for the intersection of flavors that I enjoy, satiety that lasts me hours, and nutrition that warms my vegan registered dietitian's heart.

Do I always make scramble in the morning? Honestly, no. If frequency of eating were proportional to enjoyment, I'd have a scramble four or five times each week. But even though it's quick by most recipe standards, tofu scramble is more hands-on than, say, toast. Or oatmeal.

As it is, I probably make myself a tofu scramble every other week. One of my favorite things about this meal is the fact that the leftovers keep well. When I do prepare it, I always enjoy it for the next few days in leftover form.

A versatile morning meal starter

Here's what else I love about tofu scramble: versatility! It's is a meal unto itself, but it can also be a meal starter.

Here is a short list of the many, many things I like to do with my tofu scramble:

  • Put it into breakfast tacos
  • Layer it on toast
  • Serve it with a (vegan) buttered English muffin
  • Enchiladas
  • Use it as the protein component of a vegan bowl
  • Add it to vegan fried rice
  • Use it as an ingredient in vegan nachos

I'm sure I'm missing a lot of creative ideas. But the options above are enough to illustrate that one batch of tofu scramble has a lot of utility.

Tofu scramble nutrition

From a morning nutrition standpoint, tofu scramble can't be beat.

All of the recipes that follow are great sources of plant protein. Tofu is an excellent vegan protein source, and nutritional yeast, which is a common ingredient in these scrambles, is also high in protein. You can enhance the protein of your scramble by adding beans or a vegan meat (such as tempeh bacon).

Tofu is also a nutritional superstar in other respects. It's a good source of iron, and some varieties of tofu are also good sources of calcium. It provides thiamin, otherwise known as Vitamin B1, which plays a role in energy metabolism and cell growth.

Moreover, the phytonutrients in tofu may play an important role in disease prevention. Plant compounds in soy foods called isoflavones are associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer and breast cancer recurrence, especially when they're consumed early in life.

Those same isoflavones may also have a cholesterol-lowering effect. Consumption of them is associated with reduced rates of heart disease. They may also improve cognitive function in women who are post-menopausal.

What kind of tofu is best for tofu scramble?

I recommend using firm or extra firm tofu for your scramble recipes. Either will work. I used to always prefer my scrambles with a chunky texture and extra firm tofu. Lately, I'm preferring to use firm tofu and crumble it more finely.

I don't recommend soft or silken tofu for scrambling. It turns into mush in the warm pan, and you'll miss that crumbly texture.

A black, cast iron skillet is filled with a mix of black beans, vegetables, and soy protein. How to make tofu scramble

Tofu scramble is easy to make. So easy, in fact, that it was one of the very first recipes I taught myself to cook and cooked regularly when I first became vegan. There are really just a few steps.

Press

I recommend pressing your tofu gently before you crumble it. You don't need to press it for long or use a tofu press. Simply squeeze it with gentle pressure between two tea towels. This is enough to remove excess moisture, which helps the tofu to absorb flavor.

Crumble

Use your hands to crumble your tofu in preparation of scrambling. Again, you can choose to leave it in bigger pieces or to crumble it somewhat finely. Both are good choices. Think about the texture you want, and crumble accordingly.

Sauté your vegetables

Some scramble recipes call for a lot of add-ins and vegetable additions. Others are more pared down. You can make a tofu scramble as complex or as simple as you want it to be.

Before you add tofu to your hot frying pan or skillet, you'll want to sauté any vegetables that you're using until they're tender. I do this in olive oil, but you can choose to sauté with water or broth as well.

My customary vegetables additions are onions, peppers, and chopped tomato. However, I also like to add grated carrots, scallion, and chopped broccoli. Tofu scramble is a great vehicle for using up leftover bits.

Add tofu

Next, you'll add your crumbled tofu to the skillet. Stir it together with any vegetables you have.

Add seasonings

Now it's time to season your scramble. There are so many spices, herbs, and sauces to choose from. Here are the seasonings that I add regularly:

  • Turmeric (this gives the scramble a yellow color, similar to eggs)
  • Nutritional yeast (this adds savoriness)
  • Tamari or salt (I prefer tamari, which deepens the scramble's flavor and distributes evenly
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Mustard (I think this gives the scramble a slightly spicy, but not hot, kick)
  • Freshly squeezed lemon juice

Here are seasonings that I add when I'm in the mood for them:

  • Cumin
  • Smoked paprika
  • Sweet paprika
  • Oregano
  • Italian seasoning
  • Cajun seasoning
  • Curry powder
  • Hot sauce

There's nothing authoritative about this list! It's just a sampling of flavors that I've added to scrambles and liked. Once you grow accustomed to scrambling tofu, you can start to experiment with different flavor combinations that appeal to you.

Stir and heat through

Once the vegetables, tofu, and seasonings are in your hot skillet or frying pan, your scramble will almost be ready. I recommend stirring everything gently but thoroughly, so that the seasonings are evenly and well distributed. Then, continue to heat the scramble until it's nice and fragrant. You can do this over medium low heat.

At this point, your tofu scramble will be ready to eat or store.

My secret weapon ingredient

There's one ingredient that I add to my scrambles for a perfectly creamy texture and extra flavor: tahini!

Tahini isn't necessarily a traditional tofu scramble addition. But I think it makes a big difference. The fat in the tahini helps to carry flavor. I also think that the tahini gives scrambles a slightly creamy texture and helps to bring everything together.

I like the addition of tahini so much that I have a dedicated tofu tahini scramble recipe. More on that below.

Storage

Tofu scramble can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days. Most of these recipes make four servings, so you likely won't need to store it that long.

The scrambles are excellent make-ahead breakfast options for busy work or school days. To make the scramble more portable, you can stuff it into a wrap or combine it with black beans and brown rice to make a breakfast burrito.

Can I freeze tofu scramble?

You can absolutely freeze tofu scramble, and I often do. Most scrambles can be frozen for up to six weeks. Freeze them in individual portions if you think you might like to defrost one meal at a time.

I am always so grateful when I find these little protein-rich breakfast care packages in my freezer. I thaw them overnight and give thanks for something nutritious and ready-to-eat in the morning.

7 protein-packed tofu scramble recipes

I could go on and on about the flexibility, usefulness, ease, and wholesome features of this morning meal! But food speaks louder than words.

Here are seven protein-packed tofu scramble recipes to make, adapt, and use as a starting point for your own scrambling adventures.

Classic Tofu Scramble Recipe My all-time favorite vegan scramble! Packed with plant-protein and veggies, this is a foolproof twenty minute meal. Two bowls of vegan classic tofu scramble, full of fresh vegetables and greens, ready to be served. Get the recipe Tofu Scallion Black Bean Scramble This scallion black bean tofu scramble is a fiber-filled and protein-packed vegan breakfast! Scallions add tons of flavor and are quick-cooking. A round plate is filled with a black bean tofu scramble, made with chopped scallions and accompanied by small pieces of toast. Get the recipe Tofu Quinoa Veggie Scramble This tofu quinoa veggie scramble combines the best of both worlds: protein-rich tofu and cooked whole grains. It's a hearty, healthy, one-dish vegan breakfast recipe that's easy to make. An angled photograph of a vegan breakfast plate of tofu vegetable quinoa scramble. Get the recipe Tofu Scramble Black Bean Vegan Breakfast Enchiladas These black bean and scrambled tofu enchiladas are a make-ahead, savory vegan breakfast that's packed with plant protein! They're also freezer-friendly and great for serving a crowd. A white, rimmed plate holds two vegan enchiladas that have been filled with tofu scramble and black beans. Get the recipe Basic Tofu Breakfast Scramble One of my simplest, most basic tofu scramble recipes, which is included in Food52 Vegan. An easy, crowd-pleasing answer to scrambled eggs! Get the recipe Green Tofu Scramble This green tofu scramble is exactly what it sounds like! It's a high-protein vegan breakfast scramble that's loaded with green vegetables. It's a nutritious breakfast option that can be made ahead for morning nutrition on-the-go. A round, white bowl has been filled with a mixture of scrambled tofu and thinly sliced, green zucchini. Get the recipe Tofu Tahini Scramble This tofu tahini scramble is deeply savory and flavorful. A combination of tahini and hummus create a creamy texture, while chickpeas add extra nutrition to the dish. A plate covered in baby spinach has been piled with a vegan tofu tahini scramble. A fork rests nearby. Get the recipe Tofu tahini scramble recipe

It's worth sharing a little bit more about the tofu tahini scramble above. It's an old recipe that I've returned to many times, and it's different from your run-of-the-mill scramble in a few ways.

First, the tofu is cut into small cubes, rather than crumbled. This makes the dish not traditionally "eggy," but it still eats and tastes like a tofu scramble. I enjoy the different texture, which is enhanced by the addition of chickpeas (extra protein!) and cherry tomatoes.

The scramble incorporates tahini, as some of my other scrambles do. But it also uses hummus. More chickpeas, more tahini, more flavor. The hummus is bright and tangy and adds something special to the meal.

Because the tofu tahini scramble is not super egg-like, it's an especially good recipe to enjoy at any time of day: breakfast, lunch, or dinner. You could even turn it into an appetizer for friends by serving it with endive or romaine leaves for dipping.

Here's the recipe!

A plate covered in baby spinach has been piled with a vegan tofu tahini scramble. A fork rests nearby. Print Tofu Tahini Scramble This tofu tahini scramble is deeply savory and flavorful. A combination of tahini and hummus create a creamy texture, while chickpeas add extra nutrition to the dish. Plus, 6 other tofu scramble recipes to power your day! Course Breakfast, main, Main CourseCuisine Mediterranean, middle easternDiet Diabetic, Gluten Free, Low Lactose, Low Salt, Vegan, VegetarianKeyword chickpeas, tahini, tofu, tomatoes Prep Time 15 minutesCook Time 10 minutesTotal Time 25 minutes Servings 4 servings Author Gena Hamshaw Ingredients
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 15 ounces extra firm tofu
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 3/4 cup cooked chickpeas (half of a 14.5-ounce can)
  • 3/4 cup halved grape or cherry tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons tahini
  • 1/4 cup hummus (homemade or any brand you like)
  • 1 tablespoon tamari
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
Instructions
  • Heat the oil in a deep skillet over medium high heat. Add the tofu cubes and cook till they're browning, stirring frequently (about 5 minutes). Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute longer, stirring the mixture constantly.
  • Add the chickpeas, cherry tomatoes, tahini, hummus, tamari, and lemon juice to the pan. Fold everything together and heat till the ingredients are all warmed through. Serve, with our without some greens on the side.

Fall has two effects on me, and I feel them by turns: it can make me feel focused and motivated, and it can also make me feel scattered and un-grounded. Returning to my kitchen and getting back into the rhythms of making wholesome, filling food contributes to my focus and helps to ground me.

May these savory vegan breakfasts do that for you, too. Happy scrambling.

xo

The post 7 Protein-Packed Tofu Scramble Recipes appeared first on The Full Helping.

переводить | Thu, 16 Sep 2021 14:26:47 +0000

Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce and Easy Pasta


Cauliflower Alfredo sauce turns a nutritious crucifer into the base of a delightful, creamy dairy-free pasta sauce. You can store it or use it to make an easy vegan Alfredo pasta with spinach. The pasta dish features prebiotic foods, which may benefit digestive health.

A rimmed, cream colored ceramic dish holds a creamy pasta dish with spinach.

Hi friends! Thank you for the kind responses to Sunday's post. I'm happy to say that a new oven has been installed and inspected and deemed safe to use.

Speaking of that, I've moved into the dessert phase of my recipe testing endeavors. After long days of trialing batches of baked goods, it's a relief to have an easy, comforting, and nutrient-dense plate of pasta for dinner. The creamy cauliflower Alfredo sauce that I'm sharing today has made many such meals possible.

I've seen a bunch of recipes for cauliflower Alfredo sauce over the years. Most recently, I stumbled on this one from the folks at Purple Carrot, which looked great. I loved the idea of adding spinach to the finished pasta. I try to add greens to my meals whenever I can, and pasta is such a good vehicle for them.

In the last few weeks, I've experimented with a few batches of creamy, cauliflower Alfredo sauce. I decided to add a nut or seed to the sauce—more on that below—and I'm really happy with the result.

A pasta with prebiotics

Do you hear more and more about prebiotic foods these days? I sure do, and I'm glad that these foods are getting attention.

Prebiotic foods contain types of dietary fiber that feed probiotics. Probiotics are strains of bacteria that have been associated with health benefits, including digestive regularity, skin health, and immunity. Prebiotic fibers and probiotic bacteria have a synergistic relationship.

Prebiotic foods include garlic and onions, chicory root, Jerusalem artichoke, asparagus, pulses, spinach, and cruciferous vegetables. The crucifer family includes the cauliflower featured in the cauliflower Alfredo sauce.

A green bottle is laid on a white surface, with green capsule shaped pills tumbling out beside it. The Daily Synbiotic from Seed

I've learned a lot about prebiotic foods and the bacterial strains that they sustain this summer. Why? Because I've spent time getting to know the vegan Daily Synbiotic from Seed.

A synbiotic is a prebiotic + probiotic combined. Seed's Daily Synbiotic is a 24-strain, broad spectrum probiotic and prebiotic. It's formulated for digestive, gut immunity, and additional systemic benefits. I wrote about the Synbiotic earlier this summer, when I shared it in the company of a refreshing, kombucha berry smoothie.

Months later, I can report that I'm still taking and loving the synbiotic. It has supported me and contributed to my wellness through a summer that was a lot of fun, but also full of work stress and disruption. The Daily Synbiotic is now the probiotic+prebiotic that I recommend to clients and friends.

There are so many factors that make the Seed Daily Synbiotic unique. My favorites:

Sustainability

The Daily Synbiotic is delivered and packaged in a way that is gentle to the earth. The shipping boxis made from algae that would otherwise damage delicate marine ecosystems. The synbiotic arrives in a (very beautiful) reusable glass bottle. And refills arrive in bio-based pouches that are home-compostable, edible, and dissolve in water!

2-in-1 ViaCap Delivery Technology

The Daily Synbiotic is designed as a capsule-within-a-capsule. It has a prebiotic outer capsule made from Indian pomegranate that protects the inner probiotic capsule from stomach acid, bile salt, and digestive enzymes, ensuring 100% survivability to your colon. This prebiotic also protects the probiotic against moisture and heat. As a result, you don't need to store the synbiotic in the fridge.

The probiotic inner capsule contains Seed's proprietary formula of clinically and scientifically studied bacterial strains that support healthy regularity, gut barrier integrity, skin health, heart health, and so much more.

A green, glass pill bottle is standing atop a white surface. Responsibility

Seed's reference library contains information on the research that was called upon in the synbiotic's development. The synbiotic is currently being studied in two clinical trials. The reference library also includes information on the synbiotic's rigorous allergen, pesticide, and thermostability testing.

Seed is also passionate about clear communication. As part of my experience working with the brand, I needed to complete Seed University, a free online course on Instagram that outlined the science behind the product, the gut microbiome, and probiotics in general.

Some of it was familiar to me and some wasn't. I was very glad for an opportunity to learn. And I appreciated that the team at Seed is committed to evidence-based discourse.

Daily Synbiotic offer

If you'd like to try this earth-friendly, vegan Daily Synbiotic out for yourself, you can get 15% off your first month's supply of Seed's Daily Synbiotic by using code GENA15 at checkout on the Seed website.

A creamy, vegan cauliflower Alfredo sauce is being prepared in a blender. Cauliflower Alfredo sauce ingredients

This cauliflower Alfredo spinach pasta is created in partnership with my friends at Seed. I love this recipe for its nutrition and flavor. However, I also love the simplicity of its ingredients.

Cauliflower

Is there anything cauliflower can't do? Here, it provides a creamy and nutrient-dense base for a garlicky sauce. I'd love to try the cauliflower Alfredo sauce with broccoli in place of cauliflower at some point, but the color would of course be very different!

Nuts or seeds

I've made this sauce a few times, which means that I've had a chance to add different nuts and seeds. They increase the creaminess of the cauliflower Alfredo sauce, and they also add healthful fat and good nutrition.

For example, I've added tahini and cashew butter to the sauce. Each works well for creaminess. Cashew butter is a little sweeter, while tahini is slightly more bitter. I've also tried adding a few tablespoons of shelled hemp seeds, which are a great source of protein.

Finally, I've tried the cauliflower Alfredo sauce with soaked, raw cashews. Cashews are the basis of my simple cashew cheese and cashew cream. They work magic in creamy, dairy free recipes.

Nutritional yeast

Nutritional yeast adds a "cheesy" flavor to the cauliflower Alfredo sauce.

Garlic

The garlic in this recipe can be adjusted to taste. I'm sensitive to strong garlic flavor in cooking, so I have a light touch with it. If you love garlic, you should certainly add as much as you'd like.

White miso

Miso adds both saltiness and some umami to the cauliflower Alfredo sauce. If you don't have white miso at home, you can omit it and add a little extra salt to the sauce instead.

Non-dairy milk

Unsweetened plant milk is another source of creaminess for the Alfredo pasta. I like to make this recipe with unsweetened oat or soy milk; the latter will add some protein. Unsweetened cashew milk is also a good choice for the recipe.

An overhead image of a creamy, white sauce, which has just been prepared in a blender. How to make cauliflower Alfredo sauce

Ease of preparation is one of the best things about this pasta. My goal when I made it was to combine as many steps as possible.

With that in mind, I used the same pot of boiling water to steam the cauliflower, boil the pasta, and cook the spinach. The cauliflower steams first. Then, you'll salt the cooking water and add the pasta. When the pasta is almost ready, you'll add the spinach to it.

The sauce itself is a breeze to make. Simply add your steamed cauliflower and other sauce ingredients to your blender and blend away.

Preparation & storage

You can use the cauliflower Alfredo sauce with pasta immediately after you make it. You can also store it for future use. The sauce will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to four days after you prepare it.

Can cauliflower Alfredo sauce be frozen?

Yes, you can definitely freeze the cauliflower Alfredo sauce. I like to do this in large, wide-mouthed mason jars. I'm careful to leave some head space at the top of the jar, which prevents the jar from cracks as the liquid inside freezes and expands.

The sauce can be frozen for up to six weeks.

Variations & additions

Spinach adds color and nutrition to an already wholesome pasta. However, you can add additional vegetables as you like. Broccoli florets, additional steamed cauliflower florets, cut green beans, peas, steamed zucchini or summer squash, and steamed kale would all make wonderful additions.

A close up, overhead image of rigatoni that has been dressed with cauliflower Alfredo sauce and tossed with spinach. A rimmed, cream colored ceramic dish holds a creamy pasta dish with spinach. Print Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce Cauliflower Alfredo sauce turns a nutritious crucifer into the base of a delightful, creamy dairy-free pasta sauce! You can store it or use it to make an easy vegan Alfredo pasta with spinach. Course main, sauceCuisine American, ItalianDiet Gluten Free, Low Calorie, Low Fat, Low Lactose, Vegan, VegetarianKeyword cauliflower, pasta, spinach Prep Time 10 minutesCook Time 30 minutesTotal Time 40 minutes Servings 4 servings Author Gena Hamshaw Equipment
  • blender
IngredientsCauliflower Alfredo sauce
  • 1 small head cauliflower, thick stem removed and cut into florets and pieces (about 1 lb after preparation)
  • 1 cup unsweetened oat, cashew, or soy milk
  • 1/4 cup nutritional yeast
  • 1 tablespoon white miso
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons raw cashew butter, tahini, or shelled hemp hearts (alternatively, you can use 1/4 cup soaked and drained raw cashews)
  • 1 clove raw garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine salt (extra for the pasta water, if making)
  • Freshly ground black pepper or crushed red pepper flakes, to taste
Pasta & spinach
  • 8 ounces medium pasta shape of choice (I like penne, fusilli, casarecce, and rigatoni for this recipe)
  • A few big handfuls of baby spinach or washed and chopped kale leaves
  • cashew parmesan cheese (optional, for serving)
Instructions
  • Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Fit the pot with a steamer attachment. Steam the cauliflower till fork tender (about 10 minutes). If you're preparing the cauliflower Alfredo spinach pasta, reserve the boiling water.
  • To prepare the cauliflower Alfredo sauce, add the cooked cauliflower, milk, nutritional yeast, miso, lemon juice, nut/seed butter, hemp hearts, or cashews, garlic, and sea salt to a powerful blender. Blend till smooth. Taste and add freshly ground black pepper or crushed red pepper to your liking.
  • To prepare the pasta: remove the steamer attachment from the boiling water once the cauliflower is ready. Salt the water. Add the pasta and cook according to package instructions. In the last 3 minutes of cooking time, add the spinach or kale to the pasta and simmering water. 
  • Drain the pasta and greens and return them to the pot. Add the blended cauliflower Alfredo sauce. Mix everything and adjust salt as needed; add freshly ground black pepper to taste. Serve, topped with cashew parmesan if desired.
An overhead image of a rimmed, cream colored ceramic plate on a cream colored surface. The plate holds a creamy plant-based pasta dish with greens.

I hope that this simple pasta meal will bring you the same comfort and good nutrition it has brought me in the past few, hectic weeks.

The cauliflower Alfredo sauce itself is a versatile keeper. Use it with any pasta shape, drizzle it over baked potatoes or steamed greens, and so on. It'll deliver on nourishment and creamy goodness no matter what.

xo

This post is sponsored by Seed Daily Synbiotic. All opinions are my own. Thanks for your support!

The post Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce and Easy Pasta appeared first on The Full Helping.

переводить | Thu, 02 Sep 2021 17:58:49 +0000

Protein Peanut Butter Stuffed Dates


These vegan protein peanut butter stuffed dates taste like a Snickers bar. But they're made with wholesome, plant-based ingredients, including medjool dates, peanut butter, melted dark chocolate, and pea protein.

Medjool dates that have been drizzled with dark chocolate and sea salt are arranged on a white surface.

Hot summer days rarely deter me from turning on my oven, but July had enough super warm days that I often hesitated to bake. This left me in the position of seeking out no-bake treats instead. These protein peanut butter-stuffed dates are the best one of those that I've tried. 

The dates are sweet, gooey, and feature the completely irresistible combination of chocolate and peanut butter. They're easy to make with wholesome, simple ingredients, plus they incorporate pea protein as an added bonus!

Snacking on these treats has given me a lot of joy throughout this summer of frantic (and often tricky) recipe testing. I'm glad to be sharing the recipe today.

For the love of plant protein

Plant-based protein is part of the reason that the peanut butter-stuffed dates make such a great, filling snack.

Honestly? I never thought I'd become a "vegan protein dietitian," as I now jokingly refer to myself with clients. But I've come to see how important protein contributes to satiety, energy, and immunity.

This is true in general, but it's especially important for those who are transitioning away from, or reducing, animal protein in their diet. Sourcing protein on a plant-based diet can be a learning curve. 

I lean on legumes, soy foods, and vegan meats for protein in my meals, but I also love adding a high-quality protein powder to my smoothies and snacks.

My favorite vegan pea protein

My number one plant-based protein powder is Clean Lean Protein by Nuzest.

A container of plant based protein powder.

I first tried Clean Lean Protein in 2016. I was immediately impressed by its non-gritty texture and awesome flavor.

Clean Lean Protein is sourced from peas. It's free from common allergens like gluten, soy and dairy, along with being easy to digest (read: easy on the stomach and less bloating), plus it's rigorously tested for gluten, so it's allergy-friendly.

Most importantly, it tastes great, and there are a wide-variety of flavors to choose from. Nuzest is the smoothest protein powder I've tried, and I've been a devoted fan since I sampled it years ago. 

I've now sampled four of the Clean Lean Protein flavors: Smooth Vanilla, Rich Chocolate, Real Coffee, and Chai Turmeric + MACA. They're all fantastic; from a flavor perspective, they're probably the best-tasting vegan protein powders that I've tried. They add sweetness to recipes without being aggressively sweet or artificial-tasting, which is key.

I spent much of the summer making a cold brew and frozen banana smoothie with Real Coffee Clean Lean Protein by Nuzest. For these stuffed dates, I used Smooth Vanilla, but the Rich Chocolate would also work very well in the recipe.

Vegan protein can be a useful addition to baked goods, snacks, smoothies, banana soft serve, energy bites, and more. If you'd like to give Clean Lean Protein a whirl, you can get 20% off your first purchase on the Nuzest website by entering the code GENA at checkout.

Stuffed medjool dates are being prepared on a aqua colored cutting board. How to make stuffed dates

The first step in making the stuffed dates is to cut each medjool date open and remove the pit. To do this, simply make a lengthwise cut in the date with a paring knife. It should be easy to find and retrieve the pit. 

Next, you'll combine the ingredients for stuffing the date: protein powder, peanut butter, and maple syrup. It's a soft, but slightly sticky mixture that you'll stuff into each date by the heaping tablespoon.

Next, you'll melt vegan dark chocolate (morsels, chips, or chopped chocolate bar) in the microwave (or over a double boiler). Use a tablespoon to drizzle each date generously with melted chocolate.

Medjool dates have been drizzled with dark chocolate on a parchment lined baking sheet.

Finally, you'll sprinkle flaky sea salt on top of the dates. Just for a touch of that wonderful, sweet and savory, dark chocolate-meets-sea-salt alchemy.

Chocolate dipped, stuffed dates have been sprinkled with flaky sea salt on a sheet of white parchment paper.

Finally, you'll chill or freeze the dates until the chocolate and sea salt is set. At that point, you can bite right into them and delight in how good they are.

The best dates for stuffed dates

I definitely recommend using medjool dates in the recipe! Deglet Nour dates can be great for using as a sweetener or using in raw energy bites, but they're missing the caramel-like, super-soft texture of medjool dates.

That texture is what helps to make the stuffed dates as satisfying as they are.

Melting chocolate

The melted dark chocolate is what takes the stuffed dates to the next level. Without it, the dates are sweet, salty, nutritious, and very tasty.

With the chocolate, however, they become amazing. 

I melt chocolate in a Pyrex bowl in my microwave in 30-second intervals. If you microwave longer than that, the chocolate may overheat and lose its glossiness. Stir between each interval.

You can also make a double boiler to heat the chocolate in the recipe.

Once melted, the chocolate needs an addition of a little coconut oil (just two teaspoons). This helps to make it a good texture for drizzling. It also helps to harden the chocolate once the dates are chilled.

Can I substitute peanut butter in the recipe?

Yes, you can absolutely prepare the stuffed dates without peanut butter. Almond butter is a fine substitute if that's your preference.

If you're allergic to all tree nuts, you can substitute sunflower seed butter for peanut butter in the recipe.

Storing protein peanut butter stuffed dates

Once prepared, the peanut butter stuffed dates can be stored in the fridge in an airtight container for up to ten days.

Though there's a very, very good chance that you'll polish them off before that!

A white storage container holds chocolate dipped vegan treats. Medjool dates that have been drizzled with dark chocolate and sea salt are arranged on a white surface. Print Protein Peanut Butter Stuffed Dates These vegan protein peanut butter stuffed dates taste like a Snickers bar. But they're made with wholesome, plant-based ingredients, including medjool dates, peanut butter, melted dark chocolate, and pea protein. Course Dessert, SnackCuisine AmericanDiet Gluten Free, Low Fat, Low Lactose, Vegan, VegetarianKeyword chocolate, dates, peanut butter Servings 18 dates Author Gena Hamshaw Ingredients Instructions
  • Use a paring knife to cut the dates open lengthwise. Remove the pits.
  • In a small mixing bowl, mix the peanut butter, protein powder, and maple syrup. Use a tablespoon to stuff the dates with the peanut butter protein mixture by the heaping tablespoon. Transfer the dates to a parchment lined baking sheet.
  • Melt the chocolate in 30 second intervals in a microwave or use a double boiler to melt it. Stir in the coconut oil. Drizzle the dates with the coconut oil so that they're almost entirely covered. Then, sprinkle them with flaky sea salt.
  • Transfer the dates to the fridge and chill for at least one hour, or freeze for at least fifteen minutes before enjoying.
A homemade vegan treat with dates and peanut butter has just been bitten into. It rests on a white surface.

Snack time is rarely this enjoyable or worth anticipating!

I hope you'll give the stuffed dates—and the awesome vegan protein that inspired them—a try. The world of plant-based food is rich in protein options, but it never hurts to have some wholesome assistance in getting more. Nuzest is a great way to make that happen!

xo

This post is sponsored by Nuzest USA. All opinions are my own. Thanks for your support!

The post Protein Peanut Butter Stuffed Dates appeared first on The Full Helping.

переводить | Fri, 27 Aug 2021 16:18:44 +0000

Lentil Tahini Wraps


These lentil tahini wraps are a simple, tasty, and nourishing plant-based lunch! They incorporate nutritious vegetables and legumes, and they're easy to customize.

A cream colored, rimmed serving plate holds a whole grain wrap that has been sliced in half crosswise. It's filled with vegetables and legumes.

Feels like a while since I've checked in—because it has been!

I'm just back from a really special week with my oldest friend and her family. I got away at a moment when I needed to get away. And the little escape was exactly what I needed to recharge, regroup, and feel like myself again.

This is one of many special weekend trips that I've taken to be with friends this summer. I'm making an effort to live and connect in a way that is truly new for me. I'm less attached to routine, less solitary, and less fixated on work. It feels good.

Amid these weekends of connection and the feelings and desires that drive them, I've been taking it really easy with food.

These lentil tahini wraps are a perfect example of the kind of simple, nourishing meals that have sustained me this summer.

If quarantine was the year of Gardein meatballs and spaghetti, then the summer of 2021 has been my summer of sandwiches and wraps.

Wraps are quick, easy, and satisfying to me. They're a canvas for endless possibility, but they never stress me out, which is an important consideration during the cookbook development process. And it's easy to pack them with healthful ingredients, like the lentils, tahini, and vegetables in this recipe.

A quick, nutritious lunch

What are lentil wraps? Quite simply, they're whole grain wraps that are filled with lentils. In this lentil tahini wrap recipe, the lentils are joined by finely chopped vegetables and tahini for creaminess.

I was first inspired to make the lentil tahini wraps when I purchased something similar at a local health food store. A spinach wrap was filled with a mixture of shredded vegetables, tahini, and cooked lentils.

I grabbed the wrap before hopping on a train to go upstate, too short on time to prepare something myself. And I was so glad to try it, not only because it tasted great, but also because it was convenient and healthful.

I was inspired right away to try a version of my own. I've made countless hummus wraps, and I also love my chickpea caesar wraps. But in spite of how much I love the mighty lentil, it took me until now to try lentils in a wrap.

The bowl of a food processor is filled with lentils, broccoli, carrots, and herbs. How to make lentil wraps

To prepare the lentil tahini wraps, you'll first shred some carrots into the bowl of a food processor. You could also grate the carrots by hand, but so long as you're using the processor, you may as well use it to grate the carrots.

Next, you'll put the S blade into the processor. Add cooked lentils and broccoli, tahini, lemon juice, herbs, and seasoning. Then, pulse until all of the ingredients are finely mixed.

The bowl of a food processor is filled with finely chopped vegetables, lentils, herbs, and lemon juice.

Just look at that nutritious mixture!

Honestly, I think the filling of the wraps is delicious in its own right. It would work well as a tasty, nutrient-dense dip or snack. But it's also great in these wraps, and it's also really good on a sandwich—especially with my multigrain or maple oat bread.

A whole grain wrap is being filled with a mixture of lentils and vegetables and some cucumber slices. Filling lentil tahini wraps

Once the lentil tahini filling is ready, it's time to assemble your wraps.

You can add any vegetables you like to the wraps—in addition to the vegetables that are already in the filling, of course. I love to add cucumber slices and lettuce leaves. Tomato slices, thinly sliced radish, red onion, and additional fresh herbs would all make nice additions.

If you'd like to add more plant protein to the wraps, you could add smoky tempeh slices, strips of smoked tofu, soy curls, or a vegan bacon of choice.

It's also worth saying that the broccoli in the wrap filling can be substituted as well. I can never get enough broccoli, but steamed kale, cauliflower rice, or shredded collard greens would be nice, too.

As for the wraps themselves, I love using a whole grain wrap here. But it's hard to beat the fun color of spinach wraps, if you have them on hand 🙂

Best lentils for lentil tahini wraps

I most often use black or green lentils in the lentil tahini wraps. But most types of lentils, including brown and pardina lentils, will work in the recipe.

The only type of lentil that I don't recommend for the wraps is red lentils, which become a little too mushy to work in the filling.

Make ahead & storage options

The lentil tahini wraps can be incorporated into a meal prep routine in a number of ways.

First, you can prepare the lentil vegetable filling up to three days before storing your wraps. Once made, it can be frozen for up to four weeks.

You can also prepare the wraps themselves up to two days before eating. If you do this, I recommend adding vegetables that aren't too juicy—like shaved carrots and lettuce—to the filling, rather than tomatoes.

Lentil tahini wraps are being prepared on a white work surface. They're stuffed with cucumber slices and a lentil vegetable filling. A cream colored, rimmed serving plate holds a whole grain wrap that has been sliced in half crosswise. It's filled with vegetables and legumes. Print Lentil Tahini Wraps These lentil tahini wraps are a simple, tasty, and nourishing plant-based lunch! They incorporate nutritious vegetables and legumes, and they're easy to customize. Course Main Course, main dishCuisine AmericanDiet Diabetic, Gluten Free, Low Calorie, Low Fat, Vegan, VegetarianKeyword broccoli, carrots, lentils Servings 4 servings Author Gena Hamshaw Ingredients
  • 1 cup green, black, or brown lentils (200 g)
  • 3 carrots
  • 1 cup steamed broccoli (or another green, such as raw or steamed kale, spinach, or arugula)
  • 5 tablespoons tahini
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 clove garlic (or 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder)
  • 1/4 cup parsley leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine salt
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 4 wraps of choice
  • lettuce leaves, tomatoes, cucumber slices, or any other wrap fillings you like
Instructions
  • Bring a medium sized pot of water to a rolling boil. Add the lentils. Boil the lentils for 25 minutes, or until tender. Drain the lentils and set them aside—you should have about 3 cups.
  • Peel and trim the carrots. Use a food processor to grate them. Switch the grating attachment to the S blade. Place the cooked lentils, broccoli, tahini, lemon juice, garlic, parsley, and salt into the food processor. Pulse about 20-30 times, or until the mixture is broken down significantly, but not pureed. 
  • Taste the lentil mixture. Add freshly ground black pepper to taste. Adjust the salt and lemon juice to your liking. 
  • Pile about 3/4 cup of the lentil mixture into a wrap. Add lettuce leaves and any other fillings you like. Fold in the sides and bottom of the wrap and wrap it up snugly. Slice and serve. Enjoy!
A vegan lentil tahini wrap has been sliced in half. It's placed, cut side up, on a cream colored serving dish.

The lentil tahini wraps are really simple, but they're a refreshing departure from the vegan BLTs, Tofurky mixtures, and hummus sandwiches that I lived on during lockdown. I love that they're an easy vehicle for greens, and I know that I'll be making them often through the seasons.

I hope that the wraps find their way into your lunch routine sometime soon!

xo

The post Lentil Tahini Wraps appeared first on The Full Helping.

переводить | Wed, 18 Aug 2021 14:00:00 +0000

Carrot Raisin Breakfast Cookies


These soft, chewy vegan breakfast cookies are studded with grated carrots, plump raisins, and rolled oats. They're wholesome, filling, and delicious! They're also freezer friendly and can be made ahead for breakfasts on-the-go.

A few chewy, oatmeal breakfast cookies are placed on a pale linen napkin against a bright backdrop.

I've always loved the idea of a breakfast cookie. A freshly baked cookie, full of ingredients that are wholesome enough to qualify as a sensible breakfast? Sign me up. Until now, however, breakfast cookies have been more appealing in theory than in practice.

I've tried so many different combinations, and something was always amiss. Some versions were too dense, others too pillowy. I've made batches that were overly crunchy and others that were mushy on the interior. I've never quite landed on the right combination of spices and mix-ins.

These carrot raisin breakfast cookies change everything! They're soft and chewy, the way I like cookies to be. But they're also substantial. Rolled oats give them just the right amount of heft, while grated carrots and raisins add nutrition and sweetness.

The breakfast cookies can be meal prepped, eaten on the go, or enjoyed at home, with a cup of coffee. They're wonderfully versatile.

What is a breakfast cookie?

In short, a breakfast cookie is a cookie eaten at breakfast time.

There are no rules! Breakfast cookies can be crispy or soft, big or small, sweet or not-too-sweet. They can include whatever ingredients you like and be seasoned with your favorite spices and flavors.

The upsides of breakfast

As a dietitian, I'm passionate about messaging the benefits of breakfast. Research has linked breakfast eating to improved memory and concentration. There's also an association between breakfast consumption and reduced rates of chronic health challenges, including Type 2 diabetes.

Practically speaking, breakfast helps to provide energy. Most of all, it presents us with a chance to get more of the vital nutrients we need each day, including fiber, protein, calcium, and healthful fat.

In my practice, I don't force clients to eat breakfast if they don't wish to. But I do frame breakfast skipping as a missed opportunity for nutrition. Without breakfast, a person has to source all of the day's nutrition in two meals. It's not always an easy task. Breakfast—even a small breakfast—helps with some of that heavy lifting.

With all of this in mind, I've tried to keep these vegan breakfast cookies relatively wholesome. I've certainly been known to eat less wholesome sweets in the morning (hello, leftover carrot cake!). But I like to emphasize protein and fiber when I can.

These carrot raisin breakfast cookies get a nutritional boost from rolled oats and whole wheat flour from One Degree Organics.

My favorite breakfast oats

I used my favorite rolled oats, which are the organic rolled oats from One Degree Organics, in this recipe.

I love these oats so much. They're always fresh and have a wonderfully toothsome texture. I also admire and appreciate the way the oats are grown.

The One Degree brand is known for its transparent sourcing—right down to QR codes that trace individual ingredients.

The One Degree brand is known for its transparent sourcing—right down to QR codes that trace individual ingredients back to the farmers that grew them. The oats are organic, non-GMO, and produced without the use of glyphosate.

While oats are my favorite One Degree product, I also love the brand's cereals, granolas, and flours. I used the whole wheat flour, which has a wonderfully nutty, sweet flavor, to make these breakfast cookies.

How to make breakfast cookies

The process of making these breakfast cookies is pretty simple.

I begin by mixing the wet ingredients and adding the rolled oats. This helps to soften the oats a little before baking. I think it improves the texture of the finished cookies (I tested them with and without this step).

Those wet ingredients include avocado oil (my first choice for baking), applesauce, which helps to add sweetness without too much added sugar, and a little non-dairy milk.

Dry ingredients include the whole wheat flour and ground flaxseed, which contributes some healthful fat and fiber to the recipe.

Once the wet ingredients have soaked for a while, you mix them with the dry ingredients and scoop them onto a parchment lined baking sheet. I use an ice cream scoop to do this, because I think the cookies are best when they're on the bigger side. You can easily use a 1/3 cup scoop instead.

The cookies bake for 25-30 minutes, or until lightly browning at the edges and puffed up in the center.

Are the breakfast cookies gluten free?

As written, the cookies aren't gluten-free. But you can use your favorite gluten-free, all-purpose flour blend in the cookies if you like.

Prepping and storing breakfast cookies

The breakfast cookies can be baked and stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days. They also freeze very well. You can freeze them for up to six weeks at a time and defrost them whenever you need a quick, easy breakfast option.

Ingredient variations

As a serious lover of carrot cake and all things related to carrot cake, I love the carrot raisin combination in these breakfast cookies. However, there are plenty of variations to explore.

You can replace the grated carrot in the recipe with grated zucchini. The raisins can be swapped for currents, chopped apricots, or chopped, pitted Medjool dates.

If you don't have applesauce at home, you could use mashed banana, unsweetened, canned pumpkin, or prune puree instead. There will be some color variations, but they'll all work well!

A few chewy, oatmeal breakfast cookies are placed on a pale linen napkin against a bright backdrop. Print Carrot Raisin Breakfast Cookies These soft, chewy vegan breakfast cookies are studded with grated carrots, plump raisins, and rolled oats. They're wholesome, filling, and delicious! They're also freezer friendly and can be made ahead for breakfasts on-the-go. Course Breakfast, SnackCuisine AmericanDiet Gluten Free, Low Lactose, Vegan, VegetarianKeyword carrots, cookies, raisins, walnuts Prep Time 15 minutesCook Time 25 minutesTotal Time 40 minutes Servings 10 cookies Author Gena Hamshaw Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar (96 g)
  • 1 cup applesauce (185 g)
  • 1/4 cup avocado oil
  • 3/4 cup oat, soy, almond, or cashew milk
  • 1 cup One Degree Organics rolled oats (100 g)
  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour (180 g)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons ground flax seed
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1 cup grated carrot (1 large or 2 small carrots)
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts (optional, for topping)
Instructions
  • Preheat your oven to 350F. Line one or two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  • Whisk together the brown sugar, applesauce, avocado oil, and non-dairy milk. Stir in the rolled oats. Allow this to sit while you proceed with the recipe.
  • In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, flax seed, baking powder, and salt. Add the wet ingredients. Mix to combine. Fold in the grated carrots and raisins.
  • Use an ice cream scoop or 1/3 cup scoop to scoop the cookie batter onto your baking sheet. Be sure to leave a few inches of space between the cookies. Bake the cookies for 25-30 minutes, or until the edges of the cookies are lightly browning and the tops are puffy. Allow the cookies to cool for 15 minutes before transferring them to cooling racks. Enjoy right away, or store as needed.

With summer in full swing, I've been getting away on weekends and prioritizing time with friends. It's wonderful to have a grab-and-go option for travel mornings.

If you don't wish to have them for breakfast, the cookies also make an excellent snack. They're great to pack up for a long day at the beach, a hike, or so on. I hope you'll find them as tasty, versatile, and convenient as I have.

xo

This post is sponsored by One Degree Organics. All opinions are my own. Thanks for your support!

The post Carrot Raisin Breakfast Cookies appeared first on The Full Helping.

переводить | Mon, 09 Aug 2021 19:09:33 +0000

10 Flavorful Vegan Eggplant Recipes


Eggplant is nutritious and oh-so-versatile! Here are 10 flavorful vegan recipes that show off the many ways that you can prepare eggplant at home.

A crosswise section of a stacked, vegan BLT sandwich.

It's eggplant season!

August and September are my favorite time of year for produce. Deep purple, shiny eggplant has a lot to do with this.

I know that eggplant can be controversial. Along with beets and mushrooms, it's one of the foods that my nutrition clients most often report being squeamish about.

Me? I'm a devoted eggplant fan. Eggplant is hearty, it soaks up flavor efficiently, and it is amazingly versatile. It can be baked, fried, stuffed, sautéed, or even turned into vegan "bacon," as you'll see in the vegan eggplant recipes that follow.

Eggplant is also a good source of nutrition.

The health benefits of eggplant

Eggplant is rich in health-supportive phytonutrients. Eggplant owes the beautiful purple color of its skin to anthocyanins. These are plant pigments that are associated with possible protection against cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Anthocyanins may help to enhance memory and boost cognitive function, and they're also associated with anti-inflammatory action.

Eggplant is also a source of lutein, a carotenoid that may be beneficial for eye health.

Finally, eggplant is a high fiber food. This means that it can help to keep us full, to keep blood lipids in check, and to benefit digestive health.

Types of eggplant

I nearly always cook with globe eggplant, which has a meaty texture and deep purple color. I also really like Italian eggplant, which is similar but a little smaller. Italian eggplant has super tender flesh, which is perfect for my Pasta alla Norma or stewed eggplant tomato lentils.

I love slicing Japanese and Chinese eggplants, which are long and thin, into circles, then adding the slices to stir fries. It's also fun to add lengthwise slices of these varieties to the grill.

Finally, Indian eggplants, which are short and round, are my perfect for stuffing.

You can learn more about types of eggplant in this handy primer.

How to cook eggplant

Eggplant can be grilled, pan-fried or sautéed, baked, stewed, or grilled. Eggplant flesh is sponge-like, and it absorbs flavor easily, so I think it's a great choice for marinades.

Before cooking a globe or Italian eggplant, you'll want to trim off the top. It's not usually necessary to remove eggplant skin, though if a recipe calls for doing that, then there's probably a good reason.

To salt or not to salt eggplant?

Whether or not to salt eggplant flesh prior to cooking is a topic of debate! Salting is thought to reduce any potential bitterness in eggplant.

Some say that ripe eggplant isn't bitter and needs no salting. Others feel that salting doesn't make a difference one way or the other.

Me? I'm pro-salting. I do think it helps to reduce bitterness, and more importantly, I think that it helps to tenderize the eggplant flesh. I almost always salt eggplant before cooking with it, unless I'm making baba ganoush.

Many of these vegan eggplant recipes call for a salting step. Plan accordingly!

Very thin slices of eggplant are laid out on a white surface. 10 flavorful vegan eggplant recipes

Here are ten of my favorite vegan eggplant recipes, which I hope show off the summery goodness and versatility of this nightshade.

There are stews, pasta dishes, stuffed eggplants, grain-based meals, a creative eggplant rollatini, and—last but definitely not least—a vegan eggplant bacon that'll add salty, smoky goodness to all of your late summer BLTs.

Vegan Eggplant Baked Rigatoni A perfect dish to make with your late summer eggplant, your favorite pasta shape, and a jar of your favorite marinara sauce. Simple, vegan comfort food at its best. A small bowl of vegan eggplant baked rigatoni Get the recipe Eggplant Tortilla Pizza with Arugula and Peppers This vegan eggplant tortilla pizza is perfect for a nutritious plant-based lunch! It's made with a creamy eggplant spread that's reminiscent of baba ganoush, peppery arugula, and fresh or roasted red pepper strips. An angled photo of a tortilla pizza, which is covered in arugula and peppers. Get the recipe Stewed Eggplant Tomato Lentils A savory, Mediterranean inspired eggplant, tomato, and lentil dish to celebrate the flavors and fresh produce of summer. An image of stewed eggplant tomato lentils with fresh parsley on top. Get the recipe Best Vegan Pasta alla Norma This vegan Pasta alla Norma is so saucy and satisfying! Made with eggplant, basil, capers, and cashew cheese, it's a plant-based spin on the classic Sicilian recipe. A round bowl contains a dairy-free version of Pasta alla Norma, which has been prepared with eggplant, tomatoes, and capers. A gray linen napkin is positioned nearby. Get the recipe Vegan Eggplant Rollatini These vegan eggplant rollatini are a lighter spin on lasagna rolls, but they don't sacrifice any flavor! They're filled with a protein rich tofu ricotta and wrapped in layers of baked eggplant. A perfect plant-based dish for summer entertaining. A vegan eggplant rollatini rests on a bed of green baby spinach. Get the recipe Smoky Eggplant Red Lentil Dip This smoky eggplant red lentil dip will add flavor to any sandwich, bowl, or appetizer spread. It's also packed with nutrition. A small white dip bowl contains a light orange dip. It's paired with seedy crackers. Get the recipe Curried Eggplant, Tomatoes and Chickpeas Curried eggplant, tomatoes and chickpeas make for a satisfying and flavorful summer meal. Served with a quick, homemade flatbread! An overhead image of a dish of curried eggplant, tomatoes and chickpeas. Fresh herbs and a flatbread are scattered nearby. Get the recipe Bulgur Stuffed Eggplants with Tamarind, Currants & Pine Nuts These bulgur stuffed eggplants with tamarind, currants & pine nuts are bursting with flavor and packed with nutrition. They're especially good for entertaining and serving to friends! A sumptuous, plant-based stuffed eggplant with bulgur, currants, and pine nuts Get the recipe Eggplant Quinoa This eggplant quinoa dish is a full of healthy, Mediterranean inspired ingredients! It's made with tender, roasted eggplant, white beans, and peppers, and it's dressed in a sweet and tangy balsamic vinaigrette. A bowl of cooked quinoa, eggplant, beans, and peppers is accompanied by a small plate of greens. They rest on a white tablecloth. Get the recipe Vegan Eggplant Bacon Vegan eggplant bacon will add a burst of smoky, salty flavor to sandwiches, burgers, and more! It's a healthful, plant-based alternative to meat. Best of all, it's easy to prepare. A crosswise section of a stacked, vegan BLT sandwich. Get the recipe

Eggplant bacon! Who knew, right? This is an old recipe of mine, which I originally prepared raw, in a dehydrator. Now I make it in the oven, and I prefer the baked version. I think it has a better texture and a deeper, more complex flavor.

You can learn more about making vegan eggplant bacon in this post! In the meantime, here's my go-to recipe.

A crosswise section of a stacked, vegan BLT sandwich. Print Vegan Eggplant Bacon Vegan eggplant bacon will add a burst of smoky, salty flavor to sandwiches, burgers, and more! It's a healthful, plant-based alternative to meat. Plus, 10 flavorful and versatile vegan eggplant recipes! Course sideCuisine AmericanDiet Gluten Free, Low Fat, Low Lactose, Vegan, VegetarianKeyword eggplant Prep Time 10 minutesCook Time 40 minutesmarinating time 1 hourTotal Time 1 hour 50 minutes Servings 4 servings Author Gena Hamshaw Ingredients
  • 1 medium globe eggplant
  • 3 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons avocado oil
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • pinch freshly ground black pepper
Instructions
  • Trim the top of the eggplant, then cut it into quarters lengthwise. Use a mandolin to slice the eggplant lengthwise into very thin slices (1/4" or slightly thinner).
  • Whisk the tamari, vinegar, maple syrup, oil, paprika, and black pepper together.
  • Line a rectangular glass lock (or other storage container) with the eggplant slices. Pour the marinade over the eggplant. Cover the container and shake it gently to distribute the marinade. Allow the eggplant slices to marinate for at least one hour, or up to overnight. Alternately, you can marinate the eggplant slices in a covered baking dish.
  • Preheat your oven to 325F. Line a baking sheet with parchment. Remove the eggplant slices from the marinade, reserving excess marinade, and arrange them on the parchment lined sheet. 
  • Bake the slices for 20 minutes. Flip them over, then brush the new exposed side lightly with your additional marinade. Return the slices to the oven and bake for another 20 minutes, or until they're lightly browning and crisping up at the edges. 
  • Store the slices in an airtight container for up to 1 week in the fridge. Slices can be reheated in the oven, using another parchment lined baking sheet, for about 10 minutes at 325.

Speaking of this, a BLT for lunch is sounding really great right about now.

I hope you'll enjoy the eggplant recipes—and all of the joys of late summer at the farmers market!

xo

The post 10 Flavorful Vegan Eggplant Recipes appeared first on The Full Helping.

переводить | Tue, 03 Aug 2021 16:33:12 +0000
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