ru

новости еды

радиоc

Connoisseurus Veg

Vegan Ricotta Cheese


Wooden Surface Set with Bowl of Vegan Ricotta Cheese, Strawberries, Baguette Slices and Napkin

This vegan ricotta cheese is super easy to make and tastes just like the real deal. Perfect in casseroles, pasta dishes, or for dipping!

Wooden Surface Set with Bowl of Vegan Ricotta Cheese, Strawberries, Baguette Slices and Napkin

I have a lot of recipes on this site that feature vegan ricotta cheese in some form or another. From stuffed shells, to lasagna, to pizza, I've found a lot of ways to incorporate dairy-free ricotta into my favorite dishes.

Each of those recipes uses a slightly different version of vegan ricotta — I tend to season it up based on what I'm using it for. And for that reason I don't always recommend using the ricotta from one of those recipes in another dish.

We've needed a good, basic, all-purpose vegan ricotta cheese recipe around here for a while, and it's finally here!

[feast_advanced_jump_to] What You'll Need Toasted Baguette Slice Topped with Vegan Ricotta Cheese and Parsley with Bowl, Baguette Slices and Strawberries in the Background
  • Raw cashews. They must be raw — not roasted. Roasted cashews have a totally different flavor from raw, and your ricotta won't taste right if you use them.
  • Non-dairy milk. Use something unflavored and unsweetened.
  • Tofu. Use firm or extra-firm.
  • Lemon juice. Fresh squeezed is best.
  • Salt.
How to Make Vegan Ricotta Cheese

The following is a detailed photo tutorial on how to make this dish. Scroll down if you'd like to skip right to the recipe.

  • Soak your cashews in water for about 4 to 8 hours. This will help soften them up so they blend easy.
Cashews Soaking in a Bowl of Water
  • Drain your soaked cashews and place them into a food processor bowl with some non-dairy milk.
  • Blend the ingredients together until relatively smooth. It doesn't have to be perfect — ricotta cheese is chunky, after all.
  • Add everything else to the blending device: tofu (broken up into chunks), lemon juice, and salt.
  • Pulse the device until the ingredients are well-mixed and the mixture resembles ricotta cheese. You can really make it as smooth or chunky as you like!
Collage Showing 4 Stages of Blending Vegan Ricotta Cheese in a Food Processor
  • Give your ricotta a taste test and make any adjustments you like, then serve your vegan ricotta immediately, or chill it for later.
Bowl of Vegan Ricotta Cheese with Strawberries and Baguette Slices in the Background Vegan Ricotta Tips & FAQ
  • Is this recipe gluten-free? It is!
  • Shelf-life & storage: Store your vegan ricotta in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 5 days, or in the freezer for up to 3 months.
  • How is vegan ricotta cheese used? Use it just like regular ricotta cheese! Spread it on toast, use it for dipping veggies, or layer it in a vegan pasta bake like lasagna or ziti.
  • Is there a substitute for the cashews in this recipe? I haven't tried any, but I suspect raw sunflower seeds or macadamia nuts would work.
  • Is there a substitute for the tofu in this recipe? Again, I haven't tried any, but if you'd like to experiment, try steamed cauliflower, cannellini beans, or even extra cashews.
Stack of Three Baguette Slices Topped with Vegan Ricotta Cheese More Vegan Cheese Recipes

Like this recipe? If so, be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter. And please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you make it!

Wooden Surface Set with Bowl of Vegan Ricotta Cheese, Strawberries, Baguette Slices and Napkin Print Vegan Ricotta Cheese This vegan ricotta cheese is super easy to make and tastes just like the real deal. Perfect in casseroles, pasta dishes, or for dipping! Course Appetizer, ComponentCuisine American, ItalianKeyword dairy-free cheese, vegan cheese recipe Prep Time 10 minutesSoak Time 4 hours Servings 10 Calories 109kcal Author Alissa Saenz Ingredients
  • 1 cup raw cashews, soaked in water 4-8 hours, drained and rinsed
  • 1/2 cup unflavored and unsweetened non-dairy milk
  • 1 (14 ounce or 400 gram) package extra-firm tofu
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice, or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
US CustomaryMetric Instructions
  • Place the cashews and milk into the bowl of a food processor fitted with an s-blade, then blend them to a relatively smooth paste.
  • Break the tofu into chunks and add it to the food processor, along with the lemon juice and salt.
  • Pulse the food processor until the ingredients are uniformly blended and the mixture resembles ricotta cheese.
  • Taste-test the mixture and add more lemon juice or salt if you'd like. You can also thin the mixture with extra milk if needed.
  • Use immediately or transfer to a sealed container and chill.
NotesMakes about 2 1/2 cups. NutritionServing: 0.25cup | Calories: 109kcal | Carbohydrates: 5.3g | Protein: 5.4g | Fat: 8.2g | Saturated Fat: 1.6g | Sodium: 132mg | Potassium: 144mg | Fiber: 0.8g | Sugar: 1g | Calcium: 109mg | Iron: 1mg

The post Vegan Ricotta Cheese appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

переводить | Wed, 03 Mar 2021 14:15:25 +0000

Easy Teriyaki Noodles


Close Up of a Plate of Teriyaki Noodles with a Cluster of Noodles Wrapped Around Chopsticks

These teriyaki noodles are loaded with flavor and come together in a flash! With slurpable udon noodles, savory sauce, and tender veggies, this will be your new favorite weeknight dinner.

Close Up of a Plate of Teriyaki Noodles with a Cluster of Noodles Wrapped Around Chopsticks

Is there anything more comforting than a big old bowl of saucy noodles? I think not! And let me tell you, these teriyaki noodles are about as comforting as it gets.

Another thing I love about all types of noodle dishes is the ease with which they come together. This dish is no exception!

I created the recipe using the sauce from my teriyaki tofu recipe, paired it up with noodles and veggies, and worked in a few cooking shortcuts. The result was dinner bliss!

[feast_advanced_jump_to] What You'll Need Close Up of Teriyaki Noodles in a Skillet with Wooden Spoon
  • Peanut oil. You can substitute just about any high heat oil, such as canola, coconut, or vegetable.
  • Scallions.
  • Garlic.
  • Fresh ginger.
  • Soy sauce. Substitute gluten-free tamari for a gluten-free version of this recipe.
  • Water.
  • Brown sugar. Use organic to keep the recipe vegan.
  • Rice vinegar.
  • Mirin or dry sherry. You can omit this ingredient if it's not something you normally buy, though it does add a nice flavor to the sauce.
  • Cornstarch.
  • Toasted sesame oil. Look for this in the international foods section of your supermarket.
  • Udon noodles. Plenty of other types of noodles can be substituted here — soba, rice, ramen, or even plain old spaghetti. I recommend pure buckwheat soba noodles for a gluten-free version.
  • Veggies. I used broccoli, carrots, and baby corn, but you can substitute your favorites if you'd like!
  • Edamame. Use the frozen, shelled variety. Look for them in the frozen veggies section of your supermarket.
  • Toasted sesame seeds.
How to Make Teriyaki Noodles

This section includes a detailed photo tutorial on how to make this dish. Scroll down if you'd prefer to skip right to the recipe!

Make the Sauce
  • Heat up some oil in a small saucepan, then add chopped scallions (white parts only), minced garlic, and freshly grated ginger. Sauté everything briefly, until it becomes very fragrant.
  • Now stir in soy sauce, water, brown sugar, rice vinegar, and mirin or dry sherry. Bring everything to a simmer and let it cook for about 10 minutes, stirring every now and then.
  • Stir your cornstarch together with some cold water in a small cup, then pour it into your sauce mixture.
  • Bring the sauce back up to a simmer. It should thicken up quickly. Now take it off the heat — it's done! Be sure to give it a quick taste-test and adjust any seasonings to your liking.
Collage Showing Steps for Making Teriyaki Sauce: Sauté Aromatics, Add Liquid Ingredients, Add Cornstarch Slurry, and Simmer Boil the Noodles
  • Bring a large pot of water to a boil, then add the noodles. Cook them according to the package directions.
  • When the noodles have a minute left to cook, add chopped fresh veggies. Boil them with the noodles, then drain everything together in a colander.
Udon Noodles and Vegetables Simmering in a Pot Mix it Up!
  • Combine the noodles and veggies with the sauce. You can do this by pouring the sauce over the noodles and veggies, or mix everything up in a skillet and place it on the stove for a minute if things need to be reheated.
  • Stir in the edamame.
Collage Showing Last Two Steps for Making Teriyaki Noodles: Stir in Sauce, and Stir in Edamame
  • Top your noodles with sesame seeds and scallion greens.
Wooden Surface Set with Skillet of Teriyaki Noodles with Wooden Spoon Teriyaki Noodles Tips & FAQ
  • Can this dish be made gluten-free? Yup! Just substitute gluten-free tamari for the soy sauce, and use a gluten free variety of noodle, such as rice noodles or 100% buckwheat soba noodles.
  • Shelf-life & storage: Leftovers will keep in a sealed container in the fridge for about 3 days, or in the freezer for about 3 months.
  • Can I use store-bought teriyaki sauce? Yes! You'll need about 3/4 cup.
  • Is there a way to reduce the sodium content of this dish? Because soy sauce is one of the main ingredients, the sodium content will be on the higher side no matter what. But you can lower it a bit by using reduced sodium soy sauce.
  • Feel free to substitute your favorite veggies for those the recipe calls for. Just don't use anything significantly harder or softer. Cauliflower, green beans, and snow peas would all be great choices.
Wooden Table Set with Skillet, Water Glass, and Plate of Teriyaki Noodles More Noodle Recipes

Like this recipe? If so, be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter. And please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you make it!

Close Up of a Plate of Teriyaki Noodles with a Cluster of Noodles Wrapped Around Chopsticks Print Easy Teriyaki Noodles These teriyaki noodles are loaded with flavor and come together in a flash! With slurpable udon noodles, savory sauce, and tender veggies, this will be your new favorite weeknight dinner. Course EntreeCuisine American, JapaneseKeyword Asian noodles, easy vegan dinner recipe Prep Time 15 minutesCook Time 15 minutesTotal Time 30 minutes Servings 4 Calories 327kcal Author Alissa Saenz Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon peanut oil (or high-heat oil of choice)
  • 2 scallions, white and green parts separated and chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons organic brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons mirin or dry sherry (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 6 ounces dried udon noodles
  • 2 cups fresh broccoli florets
  • 1 cup julienne cut carrots
  • 1 cup fresh baby corn, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons chilled water
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 cup frozen shelled edamame, thawed
  • Toasted sesame seeds, for serving
US CustomaryMetric Instructions
  • Heat the oil in a small saucepan over medium heat.
  • When the oil is hot, add the white parts of your scallions, garlic, and ginger. Sauté everything for about a minute, until very fragrant.
  • Stir in the soy sauce, 1/4 cup of water, brown sugar, rice vinegar, mirin or sherry.
  • Bring the liquid to a boil, lower the heat, and let the sauce simmer for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • While the sauce simmers, bring a large pot of water to a boil.
  • Add the noodles and begin cooking them according to the package directions.
  • When the noodles have one minute of cook time left, stir in the broccoli, carrots and baby corn.
  • When the cook time for the noodles is up, drain them and the veggies into a colander. Return everything to the pot.
  • When the sauce has simmered for about 10 minutes, stir the cold water and cornstarch together in a small bowl, then pour the mixture into the sauce.
  • Bring the sauce back up to a simmer and let it cook for about 1 minute, until it thickens up.
  • Pour the sauce over the noodles and veggies. Add the edamame, and stir everything to combine. You can briefly place the pot over heat if things have cooled down too much.
  • Top your noodles with the green parts of your scallions and sesame seeds. Serve.
NutritionServing: 1cup or 1/4 of total recipe | Calories: 327kcal | Carbohydrates: 53.7g | Protein: 12.2g | Fat: 6.6g | Saturated Fat: 0.8g | Sodium: 1911mg | Potassium: 578mg | Fiber: 5.5g | Sugar: 16.4g | Calcium: 75mg | Iron: 3mg

The post Easy Teriyaki Noodles appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

переводить | Mon, 01 Mar 2021 14:19:07 +0000

Vegan Banana Pancakes


Hand Drizzling Maple Syrup Over a Stack of Vegan Banana Pancakes

These vegan banana pancakes are light and fluffy with just a touch of sweetness and a hint of cinnamon! Easy to whip up and perfect for weekend breakfasts.

Hand Drizzling Maple Syrup Over a Stack of Vegan Banana Pancakes

Vegan pancakes are my go-to treat breakfast for weekends. They're easy, delicious, and you can't go wrong with anything that gets drizzled in loads of maple syrup.

But you know what I love even more than regular old vegan pancakes? These vegan banana pancakes. They're glorious, pack just the right of banana flavor, and are perfect for using leftover bananas.

[feast_advanced_jump_to] Choosing Bananas Overripe Bananas on a Marble Background

Generally, anytime you're baking with bananas or making any kind of cakey bready thing (like pancakes), your bananas must be overripe. This means lots of brown spots! The banana might even have more brown than yellow on the outside.

Using overripe bananas is important not just for the flavor of the recipe, but also for the texture. Bananas that aren't overripe will be too starchy, leading to dry, chewy pancakes. This holds true for all kinds of banana recipes, like vegan banana bread and vegan banana muffins.

What You'll Need Plate of Vegan Banana Pancakes with Bowl of Strawberries, Bunch of Bananas and Coffee Cup in the Background
  • Banana. You just need one, and make sure it's overripe!
  • Non-dairy milk. You can use just about any variety, as long as it's unsweetened and unflavored. I used Almond Breeze.
  • Oil. I used canola oil, but any oil that's suitable for baking can be substituted, such as corn, vegetable, or coconut oil.
  • Vanilla extract.
  • Flour. I've tested this recipe with all-purpose or whole wheat pastry flour. You can try another variety, but do so at your own risk.
  • Brown sugar. Make sure it's organic to keep the recipe vegan.
  • Baking powder.
  • Baking soda.
  • Cinnamon. You can leave this out if you'd like, but it adds a wonderful flavor to the recipe.
  • Salt.
How to Make Vegan Banana Pancakes

The following is a detailed photo tutorial on how to make this dish. Scroll down if you'd like to skip right to the recipe!

Make the Batter Collage Showing Steps for Making Vegan Banana Pancake Batter
  • Place your banana into a large mixing bowl and mash it up well with a fork or potato masher.
  • Now add your liquid ingredients: milk, oil, and vanilla.
  • Whisk everything together until the batter is relatively smooth. You'll still have a few banana bits in there — don't worry about them.
  • Add your dry ingredients: first the flour, then sprinkle the brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt on top. Stir everything together just until mixed. The batter will be pretty thick!
Cook the Pancakes Collage Showing 4 Stages of Cooking Vegan Banana Pancakes
  • Heat up an oiled nonstick skillet. Give the oil a minute to heat up — this step is important o prevent your pancakes from sticking to the skillet. Now drop about 1/3 cup of batter into the middle.
  • Let the batter cook for a few minutes, until it starts to darken and firm up around the edges, and some bubbles form in the center.
  • Carefully flip your pancake with a spatula.
  • Let it cook for a few minutes on the other side, until fluffy and golden brown on both sides.

Top your vegan banana pancakes with some vegan butter and maple syrup.

Overhead View of a White Wooden Table Set with Bowl of Strawberries and Plate of Vegan Banana Pancakes Vegan Banana Pancake Tips & FAQ
  • Can these pancakes be made gluten-free? I'm not sure! My best advice would be to try using an all-purpose gluten-free flour blend, but I haven't tested the recipe this way, so no promises!
  • Shelf-life & storage: Store leftover pancakes in a sealed bag or container in the fridge for up to 2 days or up to 3 months. To reheat, thaw them if frozen, them place them on a baking sheet in an 400°F preheated oven until hot.
  • Your bananas must be overripe. I can't stress this enough. If they're not overripe the recipe will not turn out right.
  • To speed up the ripening process of your bananas, store them in a paper bag for a few days.
  • Why aren't my pancakes rising? This usually means that your baking powder or baking soda is old. Test baking powder by sprinkling some in a glass of water, and test soda by sprinkling it in vinegar. Both should fizz. If either one doesn't, it's time to replace it.
  • My pancakes are sticking to the skillet! Help! First, are you using a good nonstick surface? This is essential. I personally like well-seasoned cast iron. Also make sure you're using enough oil and adding it between pancakes. Finally, the skillet needs to be hot enough! Take the time to preheat it before adding any batter.
Stack of Vegan Banana Pancakes on a Plate with a Wedge Cut Out More Vegan Pancake Recipes

Like this recipe? If so, be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter. And please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you make it!

Hand Drizzling Maple Syrup Over a Stack of Vegan Banana Pancakes Print Vegan Banana Pancakes These vegan banana pancakes are light and fluffy with just a touch of sweetness and a hint of cinnamon! Easy to whip up and perfect for weekend breakfasts. Course BreakfastCuisine AmericanKeyword vegan breakfast recipe, vegan pancakes Prep Time 10 minutesCook Time 20 minutesTotal Time 30 minutes Servings 6 pancakes Calories 153kcal Author Alissa Saenz Ingredients
  • 1 medium overripe banana
  • 3/4 cup unflavored and unsweetened non-dairy milk
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil, plus more for the skillet
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons organic brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
US CustomaryMetric Instructions
  • Place the banana into a large mixing bowl and mash it well with a fork or potato masher.
  • Add the milk, oil, and vanilla. Whisk everything together until well blended.
  • Add the flour to the bowl, then sprinkle the baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt on top.
  • Stir everything together until the ingredients are fully mixed. Don't overmix the batter.
  • Lightly oil a nonstick skillet and place it over medium heat.
  • Give the skillet a few minutes to heat up, then drop the batter, about 1/3 cup at a time, on the hot surface in rounds. Form as many rounds as you can without overcrowding the skillet.
  • Cook the pancakes for 3 to 4 minutes on each side, flipping them when they start to solidify and darken around the edges and show small bubbles towards the center.
  • Transfer the pancakes to a plate as they finish cooking, then begin another batch, adding oil to the skillet between each batch. Continue until all of the batter is used.
  • Serve the pancakes with vegan butter and maple syrup.
NutritionServing: 1pancake | Calories: 153kcal | Carbohydrates: 24.1g | Protein: 2.5g | Fat: 5.2g | Saturated Fat: 0.4g | Sodium: 223mg | Potassium: 187mg | Fiber: 1.3g | Sugar: 5.5g | Calcium: 101mg | Iron: 1mg

The post Vegan Banana Pancakes appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

переводить | Fri, 26 Feb 2021 14:29:43 +0000

Easy Baked Falafel


Baked Falafels Topped with Sesame Seeds and Parsley, with Hummus and Lemon Slices on the Side

All the deliciousness without the frying! This baked falafel is packed with flavor and super easy to make. Stuff it in a sandwich, pile it on a salad, or enjoy it on it's own!

Baked Falafels Topped with Sesame Seeds and Parsley, with Hummus and Lemon Slices on the Side

Falafel is one of my favorite takeout dishes. There's nothing quite like a loaded falafel sandwich! But I rarely make my own falafel, because frying. Frying not only results in food that's a little heavy for me to enjoy on a Monday night, but it's also a bit of a pain.

My solution: baked falafel! I've found in the past that baking is a great way to avoid frying in dishes like this sticky sesame cauliflower and these baked tofu nuggets.

Oven baked falafel is not only way healthier than the fried stuff, but it's also super easy to make.

What You'll Need Close Up of Baked Falafel on a Plate
  • Chickpeas. We're using precooked or canned chickpeas. This isn't what we'd use for traditional falafel (which uses soaked, uncooked chickpeas), but this also isn't a recipe for traditional falafel.
  • Panko breadcrumbs. These help bind the falafel and add some texture. You can substitute plain old vegan breadcrumbs if you can find them. Just make sure whatever you use isn't seasoned.
  • Onion.
  • Garlic.
  • Spices. This recipe calls for ground cumin and coriander. A pinch of cayenne pepper is optional.
  • Lemon juice. Preferably use fresh-squeezed — it's so much better than bottled!
  • Baking powder. You can skip this if needed, but it will help give your falafel a lighter texture.
  • Fresh parsley.
  • Fresh cilantro.
  • Toasted sesame seeds. You can leave these out if you don't have any on hand, but they add a nice flavor and a bit of crunch.
  • Salt.
  • Olive oil. You can use another high-heat oil if you'd like, but olive adds a great flavor to these falafel. You can also skip it for an oil-free version, although your falafel won't brown as nicely.
How to Make Baked Falafel

The following is a detailed photo tutorial on how to make this dish. Scroll down if you'd like to skip right to the recipe!

  • Place all of your ingredients except for the olive oil into a food processor bowl.
  • Pulse the mixture until the ingredients are very finely chopped and well-mixed. Don't overblend — nobody likes mushy falafel!
  • Give the mixture a taste-test and make adjustments as needed, adding salt, lemon juice, or spices to get the flavor to your liking.
Ingredients for Making Baked Falafel in a Food Processor Bowl Before and After Blending
  • Roll the mixture into 1 1/2 inch balls, placing each on an oiled baking sheet and gently pressing the tops to flatten them slightly.
  • Brush or mist the tops with olive oil. I like to be generous here to get my falafel nice and crispy!
Baked Falafels on a Baking Sheet After Baking
  • Pop your falafel into the oven and bake them for 10 to 15 minutes on each side, being very careful when you flip them.
Baked Falafels on a Baking Sheet After Baking
  • Let your falafel cool for a bit, then serve!
Plate of Baked Falafel, Cherry Tomatoes, Hummus and Lemon Slices on a White Wooden Background Baked Falafel Tips & FAQ
  • Can this recipe be made gluten-free? Probably! Try subbing vegan and gluten-free breadcrumbs for the panko.
  • Shelf-life & storage: Baked falafel will keep in a sealed container in the fridge for about 4 days, or in the freezer for about 3 months. You can also refrigerate or freeze the unbaked chickpea mixture for later, then thaw (if frozen), roll and bake.
  • Can I used dried chickpeas for this recipe? Yes, but you need to soak and cook them first. Try this method. You'll need about 1 1/2 cups of cooked chickpeas.
  • Can I make baked falafel without oil? Sure! For an oil-free version, line your baking sheet with parchment paper to prevent sticking. The falafel won't brown as much, but it will still be delicious.
  • How is baked falafel served?
    • Stuff it into a sandwich using pita bread, lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, and hummus or tahini.
    • Serve it as snack with hummus or tahini for dipping.
    • Serve it as a main dish with Mediterranean sides.
    • Use it as a salad topper.
More Vegan Falafel Recipes

Like this recipe? If so, be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter. And please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you make it!

Baked Falafels Topped with Sesame Seeds and Parsley, with Hummus and Lemon Slices on the Side Print Easy Baked Falafel All the deliciousness without the frying! This baked falafel is packed with flavor and easy enough for a weeknight. Stuff it in a sandwich, pile it on a salad, or enjoy it on it's own! Course EntreeCuisine American, Middle EasternKeyword healthy falafel, vegan falafel Prep Time 15 minutesCook Time 25 minutesTotal Time 40 minutes Servings 4 Calories 213kcal Author Alissa Saenz Ingredients
  • 1 (14 ounce or 400 gram) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 2/3 cup panko breadcrumbs
  • 1/4 cup diced onion (1 small onion)
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • Pinch cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, or as needed
US CustomaryMetric Instructions
  • Preheat the oven to 400°F and lightly oil a baking sheet.
  • Place the chickpeas, panko, onion, garlic, parsley, cilantro, lemon juice, coriander, cumin, cayenne pepper, baking powder, sesame seeds, and salt into the bowl of a food processor fitted with an s-blade.
  • Pulse the food processor until the ingredients are finely chopped and well mixed.
  • Roll the mixture into 1 1/2 inch balls, arrange them on the baking sheet, then gently press on the top of each ball to flatten it slightly.
  • Brush or spray each ball with olive oil.
  • Bake the falafel for 25 to 30 minutes, gently flipping halfway through, until browned on both sides.
  • Let the falafel cool slightly, then serve.
NutritionServing: 4falafels (or 1/4 of total batch) | Calories: 213kcal | Carbohydrates: 27.6g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 9.4g | Saturated Fat: 1.3g | Sodium: 584mg | Potassium: 302mg | Fiber: 5.1g | Sugar: 0.7g | Calcium: 95mg | Iron: 2mg

The post Easy Baked Falafel appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

переводить | Wed, 24 Feb 2021 14:44:44 +0000

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli


Close Up of a Bowl of Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Topped with Parsley

Beans and pasta are served up in a garlicky tomato base to create this cozy and comforting vegan pasta e fagioli. Hearty, delicious, and easy enough for a weeknight dinner!

White Wooden Table Set with Bowl of Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Water Glass, Pot and Spoon

Pasta e fagioli (or pasta fazool, as we called it) was a regular meal in my house growing up, which was nice, because my mom's version was vegetarian.

I didn't learn until I was older and worked in restaurants that most pasta fagioli isn't vegetarian. It usually has panchetta in it!

So I thought it would be a good idea to share a recipe for vegan pasta e fagioli here. This is based of of mom's old recipe, with a few of my own touches.

What You'll Need Pot of Vegan Pasta e Fagioli with Wooden Spoon
  • Olive oil. Technically the recipe will work with any high-heat oil, but olive oil will give it the best flavor.
  • Onion.
  • Celery.
  • Carrots.
  • Garlic.
  • Tomato paste.
  • Vegetable broth. I used Better Than Bouillon in Roasted Vegetable flavor.
  • Herbs. We're using rosemary and thyme. I prefer fresh herbs for this dish, but I've included instructions for substituting dried within the recipe.
  • Diced tomatoes. Use the canned variety that are packed in juice.
  • Beans. You've got options here! You'll need 2 cans, and you can mix and match your favorites — just about anything will work, but chickpeas, cannellini beans, butter beans, and great northern beans are my favorites for this soup.
  • Small pasta shells. Or substitute your favorite small pasta shape. Elbows and ditalini both work well.
  • Salt and pepper.
How to Make Vegan Pasta e Fagioli

The following is a detailed photo tutorial on how to make this dish. Scroll down if you'd like to skip right to the recipe!

Bowl of Vegan Pasta e Fagioli with Pot and Water Glass in the Background
  • Heat up some olive oil in a pot, then add diced onion, carrots, and celery. Sweat the veggies until they begin to soften up. Now add the garlic and cook it for about a minute with the veggies.
  • Push the veggies to the side and add the tomato paste to the pot. Sauté the tomato paste for about a minute, stirring it frequently.
  • Now stir in your broth, herbs, tomatoes and beans.
  • Bring the liquid up to a boil, lower the heat, and let the soup simmer on low for about 20 minutes, until the veggies are soft.
Collage Showing 4 Stages of Cooking Vegan Pasta e Fagioli, Sweat Veggies, Cook Tomato Paste, Add Broth, Herbs, Tomatoes, and Beans, and Simmer
  • While the soup simmers, cook the pasta according to the package instructions.
  • When the soup has finished cooking, take the pot off of heat and stir in the pasta. Season the soup with some salt and pepper, then ladle it into bowls and dig in!
Pot of Vegan Pasta e Fagioli with Tea Towel in the Background Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Tips & FAQ
  • Can this recipe be made gluten-free? Yup! Just use your favorite gluten-free pasta.
  • Shelf-life & storage: If you think you'll have leftovers, I recommend keeping the soup and pasta separate and then combining them as you dish out each individual serving. Store the pasta and soup each in their own sealed container in the fridge for up to 4 days, or in the freezer for about 3 months. You can store the pasta and soup together, but the pasta will suck up lots of broth, so only do it if you like soggy pasta!
  • Topping ideas! I always serve my vegan pasta e fagioli with a sprinkle of vegan Parmesan cheese. Coconut bacon also makes a great substitute for the pancetta you'd find in traditional pasta e fagioli.
Close Up of a Bowl of Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Topped with Parsley More Vegan Italian Soups

Like this recipe? If so, be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter. And please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you make it!

Close Up of a Bowl of Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Topped with Parsley Print Pasta e Fagioli Beans and pasta are served up in a garlicky tomato base to create this cozy and comforting vegan pasta e fagioli. Hearty, delicious, and easy enough for a weeknight dinner! Course EntreeCuisine American, ItalianKeyword vegan pasta recipe, vegan soup recipe Prep Time 15 minutesCook Time 40 minutesTotal Time 55 minutes Servings 6 Calories 312kcal Author Alissa Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus extra for pasta
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 medium carrots, diced
  • 2 medium celery stalks, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 5 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh rosemary (or 1 teaspoon dried)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves (or 2 teaspoons dried)
  • 1 (14 ounce or 400 gram) can diced tomatoes
  • 2 (14 ounce or 400 gram) cans chickpeas, cannellini beans, great northern beans, or butter beans, drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups small dried pasta shells (about 4.25 ounces)
US CustomaryMetric Instructions
  • Coat the bottom of a large pot with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and place it over medium heat.
  • When oil is hot. add the onion, carrots and celery. Sweat the veggies for about 5 minutes, until they begin to soften up.
  • Add the garlic and cook it with the veggies for about 1 minute, until very fragrant.
  • Push the veggies to the side of the pot, then add the tomato paste. Fry the tomato paste briefly, stirring it constantly, for about 1 minute.
  • Stir in the broth, rosemary, thyme, tomatoes, and beans.
  • Raise the heat and bring the soup to a boil. Lower the heat and allow it to simmer until the veggies are soft, about 30 minutes.
  • While the soup simmers, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the pasta and cook it according to the package directions. Drain and return the pasta to the pot. Toss it with a few dashes of olive oil.
  • When the soup is done simmering, stir in the pasta.
  • Remove the pot from heat and season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Ladle the soup into bowls and serve.
NutritionServing: 1.5cups | Calories: 312kcal | Carbohydrates: 51.9g | Protein: 16.1g | Fat: 4.9g | Saturated Fat: 0.9g | Sodium: 1079mg | Potassium: 659mg | Fiber: 9.7g | Sugar: 6.3g | Calcium: 116mg | Iron: 5mg

The post Vegan Pasta e Fagioli appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

переводить | Mon, 22 Feb 2021 14:21:35 +0000

Everything You Need to Know About Tofu


Sliced Block of Soft Tofu on a Cutting Board

Feeling lost when it comes to cooking with tofu? This handy guide will tell you everything you need to know, including what it is, what the different types are, and how to actually make tofu taste good!

Sliced Block of Soft Tofu on a Cutting Board

Tofu gets such a bad rap! So many people think they hate the stuff, and I used to be one of them.

But that shouldn't be the case. Many folks just don't know much about tofu, including how to prepare it.

I mean, think about it: if one day someone gave you some cocoa powder and it was a totally new-to-you ingredient, you might do the wrong things with it and decide that chocolate is disgusting. We all know that that isn't the case!

Tofu Packages on a Marble Backgroun

So I'm here to help you navigate the world of tofu. If tofu is new to you I hope you'll learn a thing or two and come to realize you love it, just like I did!

What is Tofu? Soybeans in a Glass Bowl on a Marble Background

Tofu is soy curds. That's what I was told initially. But what the heck does that mean? How does one curdle a soybean?

The easiest way to think of it is this: tofu is kind of like soy milk cheese. Yes, for real. Let me explain.

The process of making tofu basically goes like this:

  • Make some soy milk (this involves blending up soybeans in water then straining out the pulp).
  • Curdle the soy milk by adding a coagulant.
  • Strain out the liquid and compress the solid curds into a block.

Voila! That's tofu, and if you've ever made homemade ricotta cheese or paneer, you'll recognize that the process is pretty similar. Maybe that's why tofu makes such a great substitute for both ricotta cheese and paneer.

Tofu Varieties Cutting Board with 4 Varieties of Diced Tofu with Labels Reading

There are many different types of tofu, and knowing the difference is super important. Using the wrong type of tofu for a particular dish or recipe is another big reason so many people are initially turned off by the stuff!

Super-Firm Tofu Diced Super Firm Tofu on a Cutting Board

This is the best variety for beginners to cook with if you ask me. Super firm tofu is, as the name indicates, super firm.

Rule of thumb: The firmer the tofu, the lower the water content. Water tends to make tofu more challenging/time consuming to cook using popular methods like pan-frying and baking.

Super firm tofu has the lowest water content, so it's really easy to cook. You don't need to go through the step of pressing your tofu (more on that below). It's easy to brown in a skillet. It also doesn't have that spongy texture that can be off-putting to some folks.

How to use it: Try super-firm tofu in a stir-fry like this peanut tofu stir-fry, or use it to make homemade tofu paneer.

Firm and Extra-Firm Tofu Block of Extra Firm Tofu on a Marble Background

Firm and extra firm are probably the easiest tofu varieties to find at the store. They're also very versatile. Either one can be used in a stir-fry, much like super-firm tofu, but they'll also crumble up nicely in a scramble where you might normally use soft tofu.

Because these varieties have a bit more water in them than super-firm tofu, they often need to be pressed, particularly in recipes where too much moisture can prevent proper cooking.

How to use it: Firm and extra-firm tofu are my favorite tofu varieties for baking. Try these spicy baked tofu sandwiches. They'll also work in stir-fries, as a ground meat replacement in dishes like tofu tacos, or for in vegan ricotta cheese.

Soft Tofu

Soft is the type of tofu that I used the least often, but it definitely has its place.

Soft tofu has a high water content and crumbles very easily.

How to use it: This variety is soft enough to be blended smooth (and can sometimes work as a replacement for silken tofu), but can also be cooked in dishes like tofu scramble.

Silken Tofu Block of Silken Tofu on a White Plate with Spoon

Silken tofu has a totally different texture from the other varieties. You'll sometimes hear conventional soft and firm tofu varieties described as cotton tofu. Silken tofu is to those varieties pretty much as silk fabric is to cotton. It's super soft and super smooth. So soft, in fact, that you can easily scoop it up with a spoon!

Silken tofu lends itself to totally different preparation methods from the other varieties — don't try to scramble or pan-fry it!

How to use it: Silken tofu can be blended up until it's super smooth and used to make desserts like chocolate pudding or dressings like this vegan ranch. It can be diced up and added to soups or salads (you'll see this a lot in Japanese cuisine) or even deep fried.

Other Tofu Varieties

You'll occasionally see other varieties of tofu that don't fit into any of the above categories.

  • Sprouted tofu. This is tofu that's made from sprouted soybeans. It tastes pretty much the same as regular tofu.
  • Black tofu. This type of tofu is made from black soybeans. I find it to be a bit smoother than regular tofu, but that's about it.
  • Non-soybean tofu. You might see tofu made from hemp seeds, almonds, chickpeas, or other ingredients. While these aren't technically tofu, they're often similar in texture and great alternatives for folks who can't eat soy.
  • Prepared tofu. You might occasionally spot varieties of tofu that have already been cooked at the store, like fried tofu puffs or flavored baked tofu. These products are great for anyone wanting to give tofu a try but not yet ready to prepare it on their own.
How to Cook Tofu

The right tofu cooking technique is crucial! Using the wrong cooking method for your tofu can totally ruin a recipe.

Here are some of my favorite tofu cooking methods.

Pressing

Pressing your tofu isn't actually a cooking method, but rather a preparation method that you'll sometimes want to do before cooking. Pressing tofu is a way of removing moisture and condensing your tofu to make it firmer.

There are a few ways of going about it, and I've summarized each briefly below. You can find detailed instructions for each method in my tutorial on how to press tofu.

Use a Tofu Press

A tofu press is basically a box with a plunger that pushes down on your tofu to press it. There are a handful of brands available on Amazon.

Simply stick a block of tofu in your press with the plunger engaged. Let it sit for 15 to 30 minutes.

Use a Heavy Object

If you don't have a tofu press, wrap your tofu in a few layers of paper towels, then wrap it in a dish towel. Place a flat object like a cutting board on top, then use something heavy like a cast iron skillet or some canned goods to weigh it down. Let it sit for 15 to 30 minutes.

Blot it Dry

Use this method if you're short on time. Just dice your tofu and firmly blot the pieces dry with a paper towel.

Baking Stack of Savory Lemon & Herb Baked Tofu with Thyme Leaves on Top

Baking is one of the easiest ways to prepare tofu, so it's great for beginners. Use firm or extra firm tofu for this.

  • Cover your tofu in sauce. This can be store-bought sauce, like barbecue sauce or stir-fry sauce, as well as something you mix up yourself. If you've got time, let the tofu marinate for a while, but this isn't required.
  • Arrange the tofu on a baking sheet. Be sure to line it with something nonstick like parchment paper or a baking mat.
  • Bake the tofu! I usually bake mine for about 20 minutes on each side, at around 400°F, until it's shrunk and darkened a bit.

That's it! Baked tofu is great in wraps, on salads, or for snacking on by the handful.

Recipe to try: Lemon & herb baked tofu.

Pan-Frying Browned Tofu Cubes in a Skillet

This is a quick and easy method that's great for dishes like stir-fries. Use super-firm or extra firm (and pressed) tofu for this.

  • Heat up some oil in a nonstick skillet.
  • Add diced tofu. Let it cook for a few minutes on each side, until browned and crispy.

I did an entire post on this method a while back, so check it out for more guidance.

Recipe to try: Tofu stir-fry with garlic sauce.

Scrambling Skillet Filled with Tofu Scramble with Wooden Spoon

Scrambling works with anything from extra-firm to soft tofu. It's great for replicating the texture of eggs or ground meat. Pressing is recommended for this method, but not strictly necessary — the scramble will just take a bit longer to cook if you don't!

  • Heat up some oil in a nonstick skillet.
  • Crumble your tofu into the skillet. 
  • Cook the tofu until it begins to dry up and crisp, flipping it from time to time.
  • Add some seasonings and sauces. Continue cooking the tofu until any additional liquid you've added dries up.

Recipe to try: Loaded tofu scramble.

No-Cook Tofu

You don't actually have to cook tofu at all to eat it! Here are a few no-cook options to try:

Getting Started

If you've never tried tofu before, consider visiting a restaurant that knows how to prepare it before you take a crack at it yourself. A good Asian or vegetarian restaurant will usually know what they're doing.

While I've provided lots of guidance on tofu cooking techniques, I always recommend starting with a tried and true recipe before you try experimenting on your own. I've got an entire collection of them here.

Want to learn more about my favorite plant-based protein foods? Check out my post on how to make seitan and my guide to tempeh!

Like this post? If so, be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter. And please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you try any of the techniques or recipes I've linked to!

The post Everything You Need to Know About Tofu appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

переводить | Fri, 19 Feb 2021 14:45:00 +0000
сайт не использует куки, не шпионит, не следит
для использования сайта мы проверяем:
страна: US · город: · айпи: 18.210.12.229
устройство: computer · браузер: CCBot 2 · платформы:
счетчик: 1 · online:
created and powered by:
RobiYogi.com - профессиональные адаптивные сайты
00:00
00:00
близко
 пожалуйста, подождите, пока идет загрузка данных...