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Connoisseurus Veg

Connoisseurus Veg
Wed, 28 Sep 2022 13:34:26 +0000

Vegan Japanese Curry with Fried Tofu


Bowl of Vegan Japanese Curry with rice, scallions and sesame seeds.

This vegan Japanese curry is pure comfort in a bowl! Made with chunks of carrots, potatoes, peas and fried tofu in a flavor-packed sauce, it's a delicious meal that's super satisfying and easy to make!

Bowl of Vegan Japanese Curry with bunch of scallions in the background.

You'll find a lot of variation across the globe when it comes to curries.

There was a time when I thought curry just meant any dish that was made with regular old curry powder. But there's actually SO MUCH MORE to curries. I'm a little bit of a collector of vegan curry recipes, and each country and region has their own style curry with it's own unique flavors and ingredients.

Japanese curry is a cozy stew that's mild and made with a touch of cozy warming spices. Comfort food is what comes to mind when I think of this type of curry, and that's what I had in mind when I developed this vegan Japanese curry recipe.

This recipe, while delicious, isn't entirely authentic. It includes all the flavors of a traditional Japanese curry, but takes a few shortcuts in terms of cooking methods. This makes it easy to prepare and perfect for those weeknights when you're craving a hearty meal that will warm you up!

[feast_advanced_jump_to] Ingredients You'll Need
  • Peanut oil. Feel free to substitute another high-heat oil, such as vegetable, coconut, or canola oil.
  • Onion.
  • Carrots.
  • Flour. I've only tested the recipe with all-purpose wheat flour, though I'm sure there's some flexibility here since we're just using it as a thickener. A gluten-free all-purpose blend would probably work.
  • Garlic.
  • Ginger.
  • Vegetable broth. Use a good quality broth with lots of flavor. I'm a big fan of Better Than Bouillon in seasoned vegetable flavor.
  • Potato. The recipe calls for a russet potato, but other varieties like red potatoes, yellow potatoes, or even sweet potatoes would work just fine.
  • Apple. Preferably use a sweet variety. I used a Fuji.
  • Japanese curry powder. S&B seems to be the most common brand of this. If you can't find it, try using a 50/50 blend of regular curry powder and garam masala.
  • Vegan Worcestershire sauce. Most Worcestershire sauce contains anchovy paste, so be careful here. Annie's, Edward & Sons and Whole Foods brands are all vegan. You can also make homemade vegan Worcestershire sauce pretty easily.
  • Soy sauce. Tamari or liquid aminos can be substituted if needed.
  • Tomato paste.
  • Frozen peas. Frozen shelled edamame works really well in this recipe too!
  • Salt & pepper.
  • Cornstarch.
  • Tofu. Extra-firm tofu works best. Firm or super firm tofu can be substituted as long as you press it first.
  • Cooked rice.
  • Scallions. Also known as green onions.
  • Toasted sesame seeds.

Tip: Feel free to switch up the veggies in this recipe with your favorites. Try green beans, cauliflower, asparagus and peppers, keeping in mind that softer veggies will need less cook time.

How It's Made

The following is a detailed photo tutorial on how to make this dish. Scroll all the way down if you'd like to skip right to the recipe!

  • Start by sweating diced onion and chopped carrots in some oil. Cook them for a few minutes until they start to soften.
  • Stir in the flour, minced garlic and grated ginger. Make sure to stir everything well so that the flour coats the veggies evenly. Cook the mixture briefly.
Carrots, onions and flour cooking in a pot.
  • Stir in your broth, chopped potato, apple, curry powder, Worcestershire sauce and soy sauce. Bring the mixture to a simmer and let it cook until the veggies are soft and the sauce has thickened a bit.

Tip: Use a fork to pierce a potato and/or carrot slice. It should go in easily. If not, let the curry simmer a few minutes more.

Potatoes, apples and carrots simmering in curry sauce.
  • Fry the tofu while the curry simmers. Heat some oil in a skillet, dredge some tofu cubes in cornstarch, then add them to the hot oil.
  • Let the tofu pieces fry for a few minutes on each side, until they're crispy and golden.

Tip: For more guidance, see my post on how to fry tofu.

Tofu cubes frying in a skillet.
  • Stir the tomato paste and thawed frozen peas into the curry, then let it simmer a minute more before taking it off of the burner.
Vegan Japanese Curry simmering in a pot.
  • Season the curry with salt and pepper to taste, as well as some additional soy sauce if you'd like. Adjust any other seasonings to your liking.
  • Divide the fried tofu into bowls and ladle the curry over it. Top each bowl with a scoop of rice, along with a sprinkle of scallions and sesame seeds.
White wooden surface set with bowl of Vegan Japanese Curry, bunch of scallions and pot. Leftovers & Storage

If possible, store the fried tofu and curry separately to prevent the tofu from going soggy. Each component will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.

Vegan Japanese curry can be reheated in a saucepan on the stove or in the microwave. The best way to reheat the tofu is by placing the pieces under a hot broiler for a few minutes on each side, until they begin to crisp back up.

Frequently Asked Questions Can this curry be made gluten-free?

I think so! Your best bet would probably be to replace the wheat flour with an all-purpose gluten-free blend (which I haven't tried). You'll also need to use gluten-free tamari and make sure your Worcestershire sauce is gluten-free (Edward & Sons is).

Is Japanese curry spicy?

No. Japanese curry powder is very mild. Feel free to add some hot sauce or a bit of cayenne pepper if you prefer a spicier curry.

More Vegan Japanese-Inspired Recipes

Like this recipe? If so, please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you try it! Also be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter for more recipes like this one!

Bowl of Vegan Japanese Curry with rice, scallions and sesame seeds. Print Vegan Japanese Curry with Fried Tofu This vegan Japanese curry is pure comfort in a bowl! Made with chunks of carrots, potatoes, peas and fried tofu in a flavor-packed sauce, it's a delicious meal that's super satisfying and easy to make! Course EntreeCuisine American, Japanese Prep Time 20 minutesCook Time 35 minutesTotal Time 55 minutes Servings 4 Calories 425kcal Author Alissa IngredientsFor the Curry
  • 1 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 medium carrots, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 ½ teaspoons freshly grated ginger
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 large russet potato, scrubbed and diced
  • 1 apple (I used a Fuji apple), peeled and finely diced
  • 2 tablespoons Japanese curry powder, or to taste (Notes 1 and 2)
  • 1 tablespoon vegan Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce, plus more to taste
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 ½ cups frozen peas, thawed
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
For the Fried Tofu
  • 3 tablespoons peanut oil, plus more as needed
  • ¼ cup cornstarch
  • 8 ounces super firm tofu, cut into ½-inch cubes
For Serving
  • Cooked rice
  • Chopped scallions
  • Toasted sesame seeds
US Customary - Metric Instructions
  • To make the curry, start by coating the bottom of a large pot with the oil and placing it over medium heat. Give the oil a minute to heat up, then add the onion and carrots.
  • Sweat the veggies for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until they begin to soften.
  • Stir in the flour, garlic and ginger. Stir well to coat the carrots and onions with flour. Sauté everything for about 1 minute, until very fragrant.
  • Stir in the broth, potato, apple, curry powder, Worcestershire sauce, and soy sauce. Raise the heat and bring the sauce to a low boil.
  • Lower the heat and allow the curry to simmer for about 20 minutes, until the carrots and potatoes are fork tender and the curry sauce has thickened.
  • Fry the tofu while the curry simmers. First, fill a small bowl with the cornstarch.
  • Generously coat the bottom of a medium skillet with the oil and place it over medium heat.
  • While the oil heats up, place a few tofu cubes in the cornstarch and gently roll them around to coat them. Transfer the tofu cubes to the skillet and repeat until all the tofu has been added. Be careful to avoid the tofu cubes touching each other.
  • Fry the tofu for about 4 minutes on each side, until the pieces are golden brown and crispy, then remove them from the skillet and place them on a wire rack to drain.
  • When the curry has finished simmering stir in the tomato paste and peas. Let it simmer for just a minute more to heat up the peas.
  • Remove the curry from heat and season the sauce with salt and pepper to taste. Adjust any other seasonings to your liking.
  • Divide the tofu into bowls and ladle the curry overtop. Serve each bowl with rice and top with sesame seeds and scallions.
Notes
  1. If you can't find Japanese curry powder, try a mixture of garam masala and regular (English) curry powder.
  2. Two tablespoons will give you a relatively mild curry. You can start with 1 tablespoon if you prefer it very mild, or use as much as 4 tablespoons. Start with less if you're unsure, then taste-test and add more when the curry has almost finished simmering.
  3. Nutrition information does not include rice.
NutritionCalories: 425kcal | Carbohydrates: 46.9g | Protein: 13.6g | Fat: 18.6g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 716mg | Potassium: 625mg | Fiber: 8.5g | Sugar: 18.2g | Calcium: 93mg | Iron: 4mg

The post Vegan Japanese Curry with Fried Tofu appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

Connoisseurus Veg
Mon, 26 Sep 2022 13:24:20 +0000

Pasta e Ceci


Bowl of Pasta e Ceci with a sprig of rosemary on top.

Bursting with juicy tomatoes, hearty chickpeas and tender pasta in a light broth, this easy pasta e ceci is the cozy weeknight meal you've been looking for. The best part: it all cooks up in one pot in about 45 minutes!

Wooden surface set with Dutch oven, napkin and a bowl of Pasta e Ceci.

I've found my new favorite weeknight dinner. This one is not only delicious and incredibly comforting, but it's also SO EASY. We're talking about a one-pot meal! And I'm not always on board with one-pot meals. I often find this shortcut results in things like gummy pasta and undercooked beans.

But occasionally, I find a recipe where it just works.

Back when I made my vegan minestrone I went off a bit about not cooking pasta in soup broth, because soggy pasta is one of my least favorite things.

This time around I decided to throw caution to the wind (and be a little lazy) and make my pasta e ceci in one vessel. Well guess what? It turned out great! This dish has just the right broth to pasta to veggie ratio so that everything cooks up perfectly with one pot and very little fuss!

[feast_advanced_jump_to] What is pasta e ceci?

"Pasta e ceci" translates to pasta pasta and chickpeas, and that's just what it is! The pasta and chickpeas are served in a light seasoned tomato broth, but not too much of it — so this dish isn't quite a soup, but also not quite a stew, but you wouldn't really call it a regular old pasta dish with sauce — it's somewhere in between all three!

If you're a fan of pasta e fagioli, you'll enjoy this. It's similar, but instead of beans (the "fagioli), this one is made with chickpeas ("ceci").

Pot of Pasta e Ceci with wooden spoon and fresh rosemary on the side. Ingredients You'll Need
  • Olive oil. You could technically substitute another high-heat oil, but olive oil will give your pasta e ceci the best flavor.
  • Onion.
  • Carrot.
  • Celery.
  • Garlic.
  • Vegetable broth. I usually make this recipe with Better Than Bouillon in seasoned vegetable flavor, but feel free to use your favorite brand.
  • Canned diced tomatoes. Tomatoes packed in either juice or broth will work just fine with this recipe.
  • Chickpeas. We're using canned chickpeas, because this is meant to be a quick and easy meal. If you'd like to use dried chickpeas, go right ahead. You'll need to soak and cook them first. Try this method.
  • Fresh rosemary. I highly recommend using fresh rosemary rather than dried. It will give your pasta e ceci the best flavor. If you absolutely have to use dried, cut the amount back to a teaspoon.
  • Ditalini pasta. You can substitute another type of pasta, but make sure you use something with a small shape, such as orzo or small shells. If you do this you might need to adjust the simmer time in step 5. You can even use gluten-free pasta to make this recipe totally gluten-free!
  • Salt & black pepper.
How It's Made

The following is a detailed photo tutorial on how to make this dish. Scroll all the way down if you'd like to skip right to the recipe!

Did I say this was easy? It really is!

  • Heat up some olive oil in a pot and add some onion, carrots and celery. Sweat the veggies for a few minutes to begin softening them up. Next, add some garlic and cook everything for about a minute more. Keep stirring the whole time to prevent anything from burning.
Onions, carrots, and celery cooking in a pot.
  • Add some broth, diced tomatoes, fresh rosemary, and chickpeas. Stir everything well to scrape any browned bits from the bottom of the pot!
  • Let it all simmer for about 15 minutes.
Tomatoes, vegetables, and rosemary simmering in broth in a pot.
  • The pasta goes in last. Use a small variety, such as ditalini. Stir it in and let it simmer until it's tender.
Pot of Pasta e Ceci simmering on the stove.

I like to serve my pasta e ceci with some red pepper flakes, fresh parsley, and homemade vegan Parmesan cheese. Some folks like to top theirs with a drizzle of olive oil, so that's another option!

Bowl of Pasta e Ceci with a Dutch oven in the background. Leftovers & Storage

Store any leftover pasta e ceci in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. The pasta will suck up a lot of liquid as it sits. You can add some extra broth while reheating it if you'd like.

More Pasta Soups

Like this recipe? If so, please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you try it! Also be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter for more recipes like this one!

Bowl of Pasta e Ceci with a sprig of rosemary on top. Print Pasta e Ceci Bursting with juicy tomatoes, hearty chickpeas and tender pasta in a light broth, this easy pasta e ceci is the the cozy weeknight meal you've been looking for. The best part: it all cooks up in one pot in about 45 minutes! Course Entree, SoupsCuisine Italian Prep Time 15 minutesCook Time 30 minutesTotal Time 45 minutes Servings 4 Calories 339kcal Author Alissa Saenz Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 medium carrot, diced
  • 1 medium celery stalk, diced
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 cup vegetable broth
  • 1 (14 ounce or 400 gram) can diced tomatoes
  • 1 (14 ounce or 400 gram) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 cup dried ditalini pasta (or another type of small pasta)
  • Salt and black pepper, to tastes
US Customary - Metric Instructions
  • Coat the bottom of a large pot with olive oil and place it over medium heat.
  • Give the oil a minute to heat up, and then add the onion, carrot, and celery. Sweat the veggies for about 10 minutes, until they begin to soften up.
  • Add the garlic and cook for about 1 minute more, until very fragrant.
  • Stir in the broth, tomatoes, chickpeas, and rosemary.
  • Bring the liquid to a boil, reduce the heat, and allow it to simmer for about 10 minutes.
  • Stir in the pasta and bring the liquid back up to a boil.
  • Allow the pasta to cook in the soup at a low boil until al dente — this may take a minute or two longer than the time indicated on the pasta's package directions. Stir the pot occasionally while it simmers.
  • Remove the pot from the heat and season with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Ladle into bowls and serve.
NutritionServing: 1.5cups | Calories: 339kcal | Carbohydrates: 54.8g | Protein: 15.2g | Fat: 6.9g | Saturated Fat: 1.2g | Sodium: 1103mg | Potassium: 772mg | Fiber: 8g | Sugar: 5.6g | Calcium: 7mg | Iron: 19mg

The post Pasta e Ceci appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

Connoisseurus Veg
Fri, 23 Sep 2022 13:45:27 +0000

Creamy Pesto Hummus


Pesto Hummus in a bowl topped with pine nuts, pesto, and basil leaves.

This creamy pesto hummus whips up in minutes and is loaded with flavor! Perfect for dipping veggies or pita bread, piling on a salad, or slathering on a sandwich!

Bowl of Pesto Hummus with pesto, fresh basil and pine nuts on top, and pita wedges on the side.

Do you make your own hummus? You should! Not only because it's a zillion times better than store-bought, but also because there's so much you can do with it in terms of flavor variations.

I know there are some hummus purists who hate the idea of adding anything other than the traditional chickpeas, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice and tahini to their hummus. And that's fine! Enjoy your hummus how you like.

I put pesto in a batch of hummus and it was fantastic. If pesto is a new thing to you, it's basically a sauce made from fresh basil leaves, olive oil, pine nuts, and garlic, though it may contain a few other ingredients. It's suuuuuper flavorful, and pretty much anything you add it to will be as well. So it made total sense to me to add some to hummus.

The result was an absolute flavor bomb that was also really, really easy to make. Easier to make, in fact, than traditional hummus, because basil pesto hummus requires fewer ingredients to measure out and less prep work to do.

[feast_advanced_jump_to] Ingredients You'll Need
  • Chickpeas. The recipe calls for canned chickpeas (also known as garbanzo beans), but feel free to soak and cook them yourself if you prefer. You'll need about 2 cups.
  • Basil pesto. Make sure the pesto you're using is vegan, as most store-bought pesto contains Parmesan cheese. I used my homemade vegan pesto. If you prefer premade pesto, try Amore brand, which is vegan.
  • Tahini. Tahini is a paste made from blended sesame seeds. Look for it in the international aisle of your supermarket.
  • Lemon juice. Use freshly squeezed juice to give your hummus the best flavor.
  • Salt & pepper.
How It's Made

The following is a detailed photo tutorial on how to make this dish. Scroll all the way down if you'd like to skip right to the recipe!

  • Place all of your ingredients into a food processor bowl, starting with just a half teaspoon of salt and a pinch of black pepper.
Chickpeas, pesto, tahini, lemon juice, and salt in a food processor bowl.
  • Blend everything until the mixture is smooth.
  • Give the hummus a taste-test and make any adjustments you'd like. This might mean adding more salt and/or pepper, more pesto, or even more lemon juice.

Tip: If you prefer your hummus on the thinner side, thin it with a bit of water or extra virgin olive oil until it reaches your desired consistency.

Pesto Hummus in a food processor bowl just after blending.
  • I like to garnish my pesto hummus with a dollop of pesto, some pine nuts, and fresh basil leaves, but those things are all totally optional.
  • Serve your hummus and enjoy!
Bowl of Pesto Hummus with a pita wedge in it. Leftovers & Storage

Pesto hummus will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for about 4 days, or in the freezer for about 3 months.

I like to freeze my hummus in individual portion sized containers and thaw them out as I'm ready for them.

Frequently Asked Questions Is this recipe gluten-free?

It is, as long as the pesto you use is gluten-free (most brands are, as far as I'm aware).

Is pesto vegan?

Most pesto contains Parmesan cheese, so it's not vegan. Make your own pesto or specifically look for vegan brands that don't contain Parmesan.

Is there a substitute for chickpeas in this hummus recipe?

Yes! You can really use about any type of canned bean, but cannellini beans are your best bet for replacing the chickpeas.

Can I make this hummus using a blender?

It depends! I use a Vitamix and it works great for hummus, but I've worked with lower powered blenders that don't do such a good job. You may need to research yours to find the answer, or just give it a shot and eat your hummus chunky if it doesn't work!

How is hummus served?

Hummus is traditionally served as a dip with pita bread. It's also excellent for dipping veggies, chips and crackers, as a sandwich spread, or even as a pasta sauce.

More Hummus Recipes

Like this recipe? If so, please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you try it! Also be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter for more recipes like this one!

Pesto Hummus in a bowl topped with pine nuts, pesto, and basil leaves. Print Creamy Pesto Hummus This creamy pesto hummus whips up in minutes and is loaded with flavor! Perfect for dipping veggies or pita bread, piling on a salad, or slathering on a sandwich! Course AppetizerCuisine American, Italian, Middle Eastern Prep Time 10 minutesTotal Time 10 minutes Servings 6 Calories 212kcal Author Alissa Saenz Ingredients
  • 1 (14 ounce or 400 gram) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • cup vegan basil pesto
  • 3 tablespoons tahini
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon salt, plus more to taste
  • Black pepper, to taste
US Customary - Metric Instructions
  • Place the chickpeas, pesto, tahini, lemon juice, ½ teaspoon of salt and a pinch of black pepper into the bowl of a food processor fitted with an s-blade.
  • Blend the mixture until smooth and creamy, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed.
  • Taste-test the hummus and adjust any seasonings to suit your taste.
  • Serve.
NotesThis recipe makes about 1 ½ cups of hummus. NutritionServing: 0.25cups | Calories: 212kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 5.6g | Fat: 12.2g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Sodium: 725mg | Potassium: 161mg | Fiber: 4.6g | Sugar: 0.8g | Calcium: 69mg | Iron: 2mg

The post Creamy Pesto Hummus appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

Connoisseurus Veg
Wed, 21 Sep 2022 13:11:38 +0000

Classic Vegan Potato Soup


Bowl of Vegan Potato Soup topped with fresh parsley.

Creamy, classic potato soup goes dairy-free! This vegan potato soup is easy to make, totally meal-worthy, and super comforting. Perfect for dinner on a chilly night!

Wooden table set with bowl of Vegan Potato Soup, pot, spoons and water glass.

My mom's potato soup was one of my favorite things when I was growing up! I went vegetarian pretty young and it was one of those meals that could be pretty easily tweaked to suit my diet: just replace the chicken broth with vegetable broth.

I recently got a craving for that soup and decided it was time to veganize it. Fortunately, that's pretty easily done with just a few simple swaps!

My vegan potato soup turned out just as delicious as Mom's original version. This soup was cozy, comforting, and you'd never know it was dairy-free!

[feast_advanced_jump_to] Ingredients You'll Need Pot of Vegan Potato Soup with wooden spoon.
  • Vegan butter. This ingredient is normally sold near the regular butter at the supermarket. Look for brands like Earth Balance and Miyoko's.
  • Veggies. Potato soup isn't just about potatoes. This version is made with onions, celery and carrots.
  • Garlic.
  • Flour. This helps thicken up the soup. I've only tested the recipe myself with all-purpose wheat flour, but I've heard from readers that it works with gluten-free blends as well.
  • Vegetable broth.
  • Non-dairy milk. We're using this instead of dairy milk, for a rich and creamy base. I used Silk cashew milk for this batch. Oat or almond milk would also work well. Be careful with using soy milk, as the vinegar could cause some separation. For an extra rich and creamy batch of vegan potato soup, use a cup or so of full-fat coconut milk (the kind in a can) combined with another non-dairy milk. Check out my guide to dairy-free milk if you need help choosing a variety!
  • Russet potatoes. Feel free to substitute with red or gold potatoes if you prefer.
  • Herbs. Thyme and bay leaves add depth of flavor to our potato soup.
  • White wine vinegar. For just a touch of tartness to balance out the flavors. Trust me, this makes the soup! Regular white vinegar can be substituted if that's what you have on hand.
  • Salt & pepper.
How It's Made Bowl of Vegan Potato Soup with water glass in the background.
  • Melt your vegan butter in a large pot, then add your veggies and cook them up for about 10 minutes, until they begin to soften. Add the garlic and let it cook for just another minute, until very fragrant.
  • Sprinkle in the flour, just a bit at a time. Stir the veggies to coat them with the flour, and continue cooking and stirring everything for about a minute.
Carrots, onions, celery, garlic and flour cooking in a pot.
  • Pour in your broth, just a bit at a time, whisking frequently to break up any lumps that form from the flour.
  • Add the milk, herbs, and potatoes. Bring everything up to a simmer and let it cook until the potatoes and veggies are tender, about 30 minutes.

Tip: Test your potatoes for doneness by checking to see if you can easily pierce them with a fork. If you can, the soup is ready.

Pot of Vegan Potato Soup cooking with a wooden spoon in it.

Grab a bowl and dig in!

Pair of hands holding a bowl of Vegan Potato Soup over a wooden table.

Tip: Vegan potato soup is excellent on it's own, but it's also great with toppings! Try shredded vegan cheese, vegan sour cream or cashew cream, hot sauce, tempeh bacon, chopped fresh parsley, scallions or chives.

Leftovers & Storage

Leftovers of this soup keep great! Store them in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 3 days. The soup may thicken up over time — add a bit more non-dairy milk when you reheat it if needed.

I don't recommend freezing your vegan potato soup, as freezing can alter the texture of potatoes.

More Vegan Soup Recipes

Like this recipe? If so, please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you try it! Also be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter for more recipes like this one!

Bowl of Vegan Potato Soup topped with fresh parsley. Print Classic Vegan Potato Soup Creamy, classic potato soup goes dairy-free! This vegan potato soup is easy to make, totally meal-worthy, and super comforting. Perfect for dinner on a chilly night! Course SoupCuisine American Prep Time 15 minutesCook Time 45 minutesTotal Time 1 hour Servings 6 Calories 217kcal Author Alissa Saenz Ingredients
  • ¼ cup vegan butter
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1 cup diced celery (about 3 stalks)
  • 1 cup chopped carrots (about 3 carrots)
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 ½ cup vegetable broth
  • 2 ½ cups unflavored non-dairy milk
  • 1 ¾ pounds Russet potatoes (about 4 medium potatoes), scrubbed, peeled, and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 ½ teaspoons white wine vinegar
  • Salt and pepper to taste
US Customary - Metric Instructions
  • Melt the butter in a large pot over medium heat.
  • Add the onion, celery, and carrot. Sweat the veggies until softened, about 10 minutes, stirring frequently.
  • Add the garlic to the pot and cook it for about 1 minute, until very fragrant.
  • Begin sprinkling the flour into the pot, a bit at a time, stirring between additions so the flour coats the veggies. Cook the veggies and flour for about a minute, stirring frequently.
  • Begin adding broth to the pot, a bit at a time, whisking each addition in to eliminate any lumps formed by the flour.
  • Once all the broth has been added, stir in the milk, potatoes, bay leaf and thyme.
  • Raise the heat and bring the liquid to a boil.
  • Lower the heat and allow the soup to simmer, stirring occasionally, until the base thickens a bit and the potatoes are tender, about 25 to 30 minutes.
  • Remove the pot from heat. Remove and discard the bay leaves. Stir in the vinegar and season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Ladle into bowls and serve.
NutritionServing: 1.5cups | Calories: 217kcal | Carbohydrates: 30.2g | Protein: 4.6g | Fat: 8.6g | Saturated Fat: 2.4g | Sodium: 411mg | Potassium: 706mg | Fiber: 4.9g | Sugar: 4.6g | Calcium: 234mg | Iron: 4mg

The post Classic Vegan Potato Soup appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

Connoisseurus Veg
Mon, 19 Sep 2022 13:36:43 +0000

Sesame Hoisin Eggplant Stir Fry


Eggplant Stir Fry on a plate with rice and chopsticks.

This eggplant stir-fry is loaded with flavor and easy to make! Made with tender eggplant and bell peppers in garlicky hoisin sauce, it pairs up perfectly with rice for a delicious veggie-packed meal.

Plate of Eggplant Stir Fry and rice with skillet in the background.

I love eggplant and always look forward to this time of year when my garden starts producing it in abundance. But it's easy to get stuck in an eggplant rut, where I'm pretty much making the same dishes again and again (hello, eggplant Parm!).

So this year I'm working on coming up with some new delicious uses for my eggplant. That's how this eggplant stir-fry recipe was born.

Eggplant is a little different from other stir-fry veggies. In fact, eggplant doesn't lend itself to stir frying! It needs a little bit of time sitting on a hot cooking surface (without stirring) in order to get tender. That's why in this recipe we'll actually be pan frying our eggplant before we add our other veggie (bell pepper) and stir-frying everything together.

Don't worry! It may sound complicated, but this dish is really easy to throw together, and it's absolutely delicious.

[feast_advanced_jump_to] Ingredients You'll Need Five Japanese eggplants on a white wooden surface.
  • Soy sauce. Gluten-free tamari or liquid aminos can be substituted if needed.
  • Hoisin sauce. Look for this in the international foods section of your supermarket.
  • Water.
  • Rice vinegar.
  • Brown sugar. Use organic sugar to keep the recipe vegan.
  • Sambal oelek. This will add some heat to your stir-fry, and can be left out if you prefer a milder dish. It can be found in the international aisle at the strore.
  • Toasted sesame oil. Yet another item to look for in the international aisle!
  • Cornstarch.
  • Chinese five spice. This blend of cinnamon, cloves, anise, fennel and Chinese peppercorns can be found in the spice section at most stores. It will add so much flavor to your stir fry sauce, so don't skip it!
  • Peanut oil. Another high-heat oil such as canola, corn, or vegetable oil can be substituted if needed.
  • Eggplant. This recipe works best with Chinese eggplant or Japanese eggplant (pictured above), both of which cook more quickly than the more common Italian varieties of eggplant you see in most stores. Having said that, you can really make the dish with any type of eggplant. Just increase the cooking time a bit if needed!
  • Scallions. Also known as green onions.
  • Garlic.
  • Ginger.
  • Bell pepper. I'm using a red bell pepper, but any color will work!
  • Sesame seeds.
  • Fresh basil. Thai basil or holy basil work great in this recipe if you can get your hands on them. If not, Italian basil is totally fine!
  • Cooked rice. Use your favorite variety. I love this stir-fry with jasmine rice.

Tip: Want to add some protein to your eggplant stir fry? Try including this crispy fried tofu or some simple pan-fried tofu. Just add either one at the same time as your sauce.

How It's Made

The following is a detailed photo tutorial on how to make this dish. Scroll all the way down if you'd like to skip right to the recipe!

  • Do all of your prep work before you start cooking: whisk together the sauce ingredients, chop your veggies, mince your garlic, and grate your ginger.
Hand whisking stir-fry sauce ingredients together in a glass bowl.
  • Heat your peanut oil in a a large nonstick skillet, then add your diced eggplant. Cook the eggplant for about 5 minutes over medium-high heat, but resist the urge to stir it constantly. Just flip the pieces once or twice to get them browned on multiple sides.
  • Once the eggplant pieces are browned and tender, remove them from the skillet and transfer them to a plate.

Tip: Avoid crowding the skillet when cooking your eggplant. This may mean cooking it in a couple of batches. I did two batches for the stir-fry shown in the process photos.

Diced eggplant cooking in a skillet.
  • Add some more oil to the skillet, let it heat up, then add scallions (white parts only), garlic, and ginger. Cook everything very briefly.
  • Turn up the heat and add your bell pepper. Stir-fry the pepper for a couple of minutes, until the pieces are bright red and tender-crisp.
Red peppers, garlic, ginger and scallions cooking in a skillet.
  • Lower the heat a smidge and return the eggplant to the skillet, then carefully pour in the sauce.
  • Toss everything well with a spatula and cook it very briefly, just until the sauce bubbles and thickens.
Eggplant Stir Fry cooking in a skillet.
  • Take the skillet off of the burner and stir in the fresh basil. Top your eggplant stir fry with sesame seeds and the green parts of your scallions.
Eggplant Stir Fry in a skillet with wooden spoon.
  • Serve the stir fry with rice and enjoy!
White wooden surface set with a plate of Eggplant Stir Fry and rice. Leftovers & Storage

Leftover eggplant stir fry will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.

Frequently Asked Questions Is this eggplant stir fry gluten-free?

It can be! Just use gluten-free tamari and hoisin sauce.

Do I need to salt eggplant before stir frying it?

Not necessarily. Japanese eggplants tend to be less bitter than larger varieties, so you may not need to salt them. If you substitute another variety and/or are using an eggplant that's been in the fridge for a few days or shows browning when cut open, consider salting it. This article contains instructions on how to do that.

Is this stir-fry spicy?

A bit. The sambal oelek adds some heat. Leave it out for a milder dish, or use some extra for additional kick.

More Stir Fry Recipes

Like this recipe? If so, please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you try it! Also be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter for more recipes like this one!

Eggplant Stir Fry on a plate with rice and chopsticks. Print Sesame Hoisin Eggplant Stir Fry This eggplant stir-fry is loaded with flavor and easy to make! Made with tender eggplant and bell peppers in garlicky hoisin sauce, it pairs up perfectly with rice for a delicious veggie-packed meal. Course EntreeCuisine American, Asian-Inspired Prep Time 15 minutesCook Time 15 minutesTotal Time 30 minutes Servings 4 Calories 190kcal Author Alissa Saenz Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons hoisin sauce
  • 2 tablespoons chilled water
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon organic brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon sambal oelek
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • ½ teaspoon Chinese 5-spice
  • 3 tablespoons peanut oil, divided, plus more as needed (up to 5 tablespoons total)
  • 1 pound eggplant (Note 1), diced into roughly 1-inch pieces
  • 2 scallions, white and green parts separated and chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, cut into roughly ½ inch pieces
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh basil
  • Toasted sesame seeds
  • Cooked rice, for serving
US Customary - Metric Instructions
  • Whisk the soy sauce, hoisin sauce, water, rice vinegar, brown sugar, sambal oelek, sesame oil, cornstarch, and 5 spice together in a small bowl.
  • Coat the bottom of a large skillet with 2 tablespoons of oil and place it over medium-high heat.
  • Give the oil a minute to heat up, then add the diced eggplant in an even layer. Avoid crowding the skillet and cook the eggplant in batches if needed, adding oil to the skillet between batches if it dries up.
  • Cook the eggplant for 5 to 6 minutes, until tender, flipping the pieces only once or twice to get browning on multiple sides.
  • Remove the eggplant from the skillet and transfer it to a plate.
  • Add the remaining tablespoon of oil to the skillet.
  • Give the oil a minute to heat up, then add the white parts of your scallions to the skillet, along with the garlic and ginger.
  • Sauté everything briefly, for about 1 minute, until very fragrant.
  • Raise the heat to high and add the bell pepper to the skillet. Stir fry the pepper for about 2 minutes, until bright red and tender crisp.
  • Lower the heat to medium and carefully pour the sauce into the skillet (Note 2). Toss the ingredients to coat the veggies in sauce and cook everything for 30 to 60 seconds, until the sauce thickens.
  • Remove the skillet from heat and stir in the basil. Top the stir-fry with sesame seeds and the green parts of your scallions.
  • Serve with rice.
Notes
  1. Japanese or Chinese eggplant are the preferred varieties for this recipe, but any variety will do.
  2. Use caution, as the sauce can easily sputter when it hits the hot surface.
  3. Nutrition information does not include rice.
NutritionCalories: 190kcal | Carbohydrates: 18.7g | Protein: 2.9g | Fat: 12.3g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Sodium: 811mg | Potassium: 401mg | Fiber: 5.2g | Sugar: 9.7g | Calcium: 39mg | Iron: 1mg

The post Sesame Hoisin Eggplant Stir Fry appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

Connoisseurus Veg
Fri, 16 Sep 2022 13:17:22 +0000

Classic Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookies


Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookies arranged on a white wooden surface.

Soft, chewy, and bursting with spices, these vegan oatmeal raisin cookies taste just like the ones you grew up eating, but without any eggs or dairy! They're super easy to make and perfect for dunking.

Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookies on a white plate.

It's that time of year! I'm really enjoying the cooler temperatures and being able to fire up the oven (comfortably) once again. Lately it seems like it's been a parade of sweets coming out of my kitchen, and fall flavors are prominently featured.

Are you guys craving some sweet fall flavors? Because vegan oatmeal raisin cookies are just about the easiest way to satisfy that. (Although I love these cookies any time of year.)

I grew up making the vanishing oatmeal raisin cookie recipe that's under the lid of Quaker Oats, so I adapted that recipe in order to create this vegan oatmeal raisin cookie recipe. It turned out absolutely delicious!

[feast_advanced_jump_to] Ingredients You'll Need
  • Vegan butter. This is normally sold near the regular butter in supermarkets. Earth Balance and Miyoko's are a couple of popular brands to look for.
  • Sugar. Use organic sugar to keep the recipe vegan.
  • Brown sugar. This needs to be organic as well.
  • Unsweetened applesauce. Did you know that applesauce works as a vegan egg substitute? It does! And as an added bonus, it allows us to use less vegan butter in the recipe, which, believe it or not, results in a better cookie. These cookies have excellent texture and they actually hold together better that versions that use more butter.
  • Vanilla extract.
  • Rolled oats. Quick cooking oats should work as a substitute, though the texture of your cookies will be slightly different.
  • Flour. We're using regular old all-purpose wheat flour. I can't promise that the recipe will work with any other varieties.
  • Baking soda.
  • Spices. We're using cinnamon, ginger and cloves.
  • Salt.
  • Raisins.
  • Walnuts. Leave these out if you're not a fan, or substitute another type of nut, such as pecans.

Tip: Not into raisins? Use vegan chocolate chips instead!

How They're Made

The following is a detailed photo tutorial on how to make this dish. Scroll all the way down if you'd like to skip right to the recipe!

  • Start with your butter and sugars in a large mixing bowl. Your butter needs to be at room temperature, so it should be slightly soft. Grab an electric mixer and beat them together until thoroughly mixed and cream.
  • Beat it the applesauce and vanilla.

Note: Use a hand mixer or stand mixer. Whichever you prefer is fine!

Electric mixer beating vegan butter and sugars together in a bowl.
  • Dry ingredients go in next. Start by stirring in your oats.
  • Once the oats are incorporated, you can add the rest. I kept this as a one-bowl recipe and here's the trick: add your flour to the bowl, and then sprinkle everything else on top of your flour before stirring — baking soda, spices and salt. Make sure to sprinkle the baking soda around a bit so it doesn't all hit the liquid at once when you begin stirring.
Hands stirring flour into a bowl of cookie dough.
  • Fold in your walnuts and raisins last.
Hand stirring raisins and walnuts into a bowl of cookie dough.
  • Roll your cookie dough into balls and arrange them on a couple of cookie sheets lined with parchment paper. Because these cookies don't contain as much butter as others versions, they won't spread out as much, so be sure to flatten them out just a bit before popping them into the oven.

Tip: A cookie scoop is a great tool for ensuring that your cookies are evenly sized and uniformly shaped.

Cookie dough balls on a parchment paper lined baking sheet.
  • Bake the cookies for 10 to 12 minutes, keeping the time near the lower end of this range for softer cookies, and towards the higher end for more crisp cookies.
Close up of Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookies on a plate. Shelf Life & Storage

Vegan oatmeal raisin cookies will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for about 2 weeks or in the freezer for about 3 months.

Frequently Asked Questions Can these cookies be made gluten-free?

Possibly! An all-purpose gluten-free flour blend like Bob's Red Mill or King Arthur's might work, but I haven't tested the recipe with either, so no promises. You'll also need to make sure your oats are certified gluten-free.

Why does the sugar need to be organic?

Most sugar in the United States is processed using animal bones. Organic is processed differently, so it's considered vegan.

Can I make the dough ahead of time, refrigerate it, and bake the cookies later?

Yes, but be sure to use it within two days and bring it up to room temperature before baking.

White wooden surface set with plate of Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookies, glass of almond milk, and striped straw. More Vegan Cookie Recipes

Like this recipe? If so, please stop back and leave me a review and rating below if you try it! Also be sure to follow me on Facebook, Pinterest or Instagram, or subscribe to my newsletter for more recipes like this one!

Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookies arranged on a white wooden surface. Print Classic Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookies Soft, chewy, and bursting with spices, these vegan oatmeal raisin cookies taste just like the ones you grew up eating, but without any eggs or dairy! They're super easy to make and perfect for dunking. Course DessertCuisine American Prep Time 15 minutesCook Time 12 minutesTotal Time 27 minutes Servings 36 cookies Calories 133kcal Author Alissa Saenz Ingredients
  • 1 cup vegan butter, at room temperature
  • ¾ cup organic brown sugar
  • cup organic granulated sugar
  • ½ cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3 cups rolled oats
  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 ½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup raisins
  • ½ cup chopped walnuts (optional)
US Customary - Metric Instructions
  • Preheat the oven to 350°F and line a couple of baking sheets with parchment paper.
  • Use an electric mixer to beat the butter, brown sugar, and granulated sugar in a large mixing bowl. Beat for about 1 minute, until fully blended and creamy.
  • Beat in the applesauce and vanilla.
  • Stir the oats into the mixture by hand.
  • Add the flour to the bowl, then sprinkle the baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, cloves and salt on top of the flour.
  • Stir the ingredients together until they're fully blended and form a dough.
  • Fold in the raisins and walnuts.
  • Roll the dough into balls, using about 3 tablespoons of dough per ball.
  • Arrange the dough balls on the baking sheets, with at least 2 inches of space between them. Flatten out each dough ball slightly with your hands or the back of a spoon. (Note 1)
  • Bake the cookies until soft and slightly browned, for about 10 to 12 minutes.
  • Transfer the baking sheets to a cooling rack and allow the cookies to cool slightly before removing the from the baking sheets.
  • Serve the cookies immediately, or store them in a sealed container for up to 2 weeks.
Notes
  1. These cookies don't spread out as much as many other cookies do, so they'll be a bit domed if you don't flatten them.
  2. Adapted from Quaker Oats Vanishing Oatmeal Raisin Cookies.
NutritionServing: 1cookie | Calories: 133kcal | Carbohydrates: 17.3g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 6.4g | Saturated Fat: 1.7g | Sodium: 122mg | Potassium: 78mg | Fiber: 1.2g | Sugar: 7.6g | Calcium: 1mg | Iron: 2mg

The post Classic Vegan Oatmeal Raisin Cookies appeared first on Connoisseurus Veg.

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